Berlin Tourist Attractions

Built by Prussian king Frederick William II during the early Batavian Revolution, the Brandenburg Gate is one of the most iconic landmarks in Germany. This 18th-century Neoclassical sandstone monument was modeled on the Acropolis in Athens and is located at the start of the road that extends from Berlin to Brandenburg an der Havel read more arrow
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Originally established in 1679 as a herb garden for the Royal Palace, the Berlin-Dahlem Botanical Gardens are now one of the largest and most important of their kind in the world. They sprawl across more than 100 acres in the Lichterfelde area of Berlin, with around 22,000 different plant species represented read more arrow
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Situated between the River Spree and the Kupfergraben, Museum Island is a UNESCO World Heritage Site that’s packed with many of Berlin’s most important cultural institutions. It’s here that the historic Altes Museum is found, having been built in 1830 to house the Crown Jewels, as well as the Neues Museum that was established in 1855 and rebuilt following World War II read more arrow
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Established in 1961 to help stem the flow of refugees from East Germany to West Germany, the Berlin Wall has become synonymous with the city. When it was torn down in 1989, the graffiti-covered wall extended for 155 kilometers and rose four meters high, with almost 300 observation towers and more than 50 bunkers read more arrow
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Of note is the Haus am Checkpoint Charlie, a museum dedicated to what was the best-known crossing point between East and West Berlin. Checkpoint Charlie was the name given by Western Allies to the crossing during the Cold War (1947-1991) and it was here that Soviet and American tanks came face-to-face during the Berlin Crisis of 1961 read more arrow
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Once the most important residence for German royalty, Charlottenburg Palace is a lavish, 17th-century estate and the largest palace in Berlin. It is renowned for its opulent baroque and rococo interiors that include a 50-meter-high central dome, as well as a stunning formal garden surrounded by woodlands read more arrow
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Stretching from the Brandenburg Gate to the Lustgarten, Unter den Linden is Berlin’s most famous street. Its name translates as “Under the Lime Trees Avenue” and it began as a 16th-century riding track for royalty to go hunting in the Tiergarten read more arrow
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Originally used as a hunting reserve for Berlin royalty, the Grosser Tiergarten was transformed into a public oasis in 1700 and now spans more than 500 acres of English-style parklands. It’s planted with an abundance of trees, large expanses of grassy lawns and picturesque floral borders, as well as being home to a number of important monuments read more arrow
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Constructed to house the Imperial Diet of the German Empire, the Reichstag was created as a massive Neo-Renaissance palace, with the foundation stone laid by the Emperor himself in 1884. It opened ten years later but was severely damaged after being set on fire in 1933 read more arrow
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Nicknamed “the hollow tooth” by Berliners, the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church is one of Berlin’s most interesting landmarks and located on the Kurfürstendamm in the center of Breitscheidplatz. It includes the damaged spire of a late-19th-century church, as well as a modern church and belfry dating to the 1960s read more arrow
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One of Berlin’s largest squares, the Gendarmenmarkt is a charismatic corner of the city and a popular meeting point for both locals and tourists. It’s flanked by three historic buildings - the Konzerthaus, the Französischer Dom and the Berliner Dom - and was named after a regiment of the Gendarmerie that once had their stables here read more arrow
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