Northern Territory Attractions

Located part way between Alice Springs and Uluru in Watarrka National Park is magnificent Kings Canyon, which boasts the deepest gorge in the Red Centre. Sandstone walls tower more than 100 meters above Kings Creek that meanders below, with sections of the gorge forming part of a sacred Aboriginal site to the Luritja people.
8/10
Situated in the heart of the Red Centre is the UNESCO World Heritage-listed Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. It includes one of Australia’s most iconic landmarks, Uluru (formerly known as Ayers Rock), as well as the dome-shaped rock formations of Kata Tjuta, or the Olgas, which lie around 40 kilometers away.
7.9/10
Australia’s largest national park and one of the county’s most magnificent wilderness areas is Kakadu National Park. This UNESCO World Heritage-listed landscape includes soaring sandstone escarpments, tall monsoon rain forests and wildlife rich river estuaries and mangrove swamps, together with expansive floodplains that transform with the seasons.
7.5/10
Boasting an outstanding collection of aircraft that have played a role in the history of Australia is the Darwin Aviation Heritage Centre. It was established in 1976 when a group of aviation enthusiasts wanted to preserve relics following the destruction of Cyclone Tracy, with the current museum opening its doors to the public in 1990.
7.5/10
Located at East Point, the Defence of Darwin Experience provides an immersive look at the role the city played in World War II. Visual and multimedia displays offer first-hand accounts of the Bombing of Darwin, together with artifacts and objects that reflect the city’s tumultuous past.
7.5/10
Set within Nitmiluk National Park, around 250 kilometers southeast of Darwin, Katherine Gorge is an undisputed highlight of visiting the Northern Territory. It borders Kakadu National Park and is of particular importance to the Jawoyn people who are the custodians of the land here.
7.5/10
Named after Frederick Henry Litchfield who was an early pioneer and explorer in the Northern Territory, Litchfield National Park is one of the most popular day trips from Darwin. It features waterfalls and springs along the Table Top Range escarpment, with tropical monsoon forests, giant termite mounds and natural swimming holes.
7.5/10
Set within the West MacDonnell Ranges just a short drive from Alice Springs, Simpsons Gap is one of the most prominent gaps in the region and the site of a permanent waterhole. Its rugged cliffs stand in striking contrast to the desert plains and dunes that surround the gap, with white-barked ghost gums and eucalyptus dotting the landscape.
7/10
Situated to the north of Darwin’s city center on the edge of Fannie Bay is the ever-popular Mindil Beach Markets. It takes place every Thursday and Sunday evening during the dry months of April through to October and is particularly famed for its magnificent sunsets over the Indian Ocean.
7/10
Located at Knuckey Lagoon, around 15 minutes’ drive from Darwin’s city center, Crocodylus Park was set up by renowned crocodile biologist Professor Grahame Webb. There are both saltwater and freshwater crocodiles of all ages on display, from 30 centimeter-long hatchlings to giant 5-meter specimens, as well as a number of American alligators.
6.5/10

Other Northern Territory-related lists of tourist attractions and sightseeing spots:

World Attractions
Oceania Pacific attractions
Australia attractions
Northern Territory attractions