Thuringia Tourist Attractions

Located high up on a precipice overlooking the town of Eisenach, the Wartburg is a UNESCO World Heritage-listed castle that dates to the Middle Ages. It was the former home of St read more arrow
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One of the most important landmarks in the city of Erfurt, the Krämerbrücke (Merchants' bridge) is a medieval footbridge that connects the Benediktsplatz and Wenigemarkt and is lined with half-timbered buildings on both sides. The 79-meter-long bridge spans the Breitstrom (a branch of the Gera River), with its current limestone and sandstone construction replacing a number of earlier wooden bridges that were destroyed by fires read more arrow
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The only national park in Thuringia, the Hainich National Park protects a magnificent tract of native beech forest and forms part of the Primeval Beech Forests of the Carpathians and the Ancient Beech Forests of Germany World Heritage Site. It’s one of the last remaining, undissected beech forests to retain distinct Central European characteristics and supports a number of rare and vulnerable species read more arrow
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Serving as the former residence of the Dukes of Saxe-Weimar and Eisenach, the Stadtschloss Weimar is a lavish palace on the edge of Ilm Park. Originally established as a medieval moated castle in the 10th century, it was reconstructed multiple times following fires before being rebuilt as a Baroque palace in the 17th century read more arrow
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Coming Soon. read more arrow
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Set within a 550-year-old half-timbered house, the Bach House in Eisenach explores the life and work of composer Johann Sebastian Bach. The building was mistakenly identified as Bach’s birth house in the 19th century and was opened as the world’s first museum dedicated to Bach in 1907 read more arrow
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One of the oldest surviving half-timbered houses in Thuringia, the Lutherhaus in Eisenach was the home of Martin Luther between 1498 and 1501 when he lived here as a schoolboy with the Cotta family. It has been a significant Reformation historical site since the 19th century and in 2011 was designated as a European Cultural Heritage Site before being redeveloped and extended for the anniversary of the Reformation in 2017 read more arrow
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Located in the Kyffhäuser Hills near the village of Rottleben, the Barbarossa Cave is a spectacular cave that features large caverns, grottos and lakes. Moisture in the cave has lead to the anhydrite forming gypsum on the cave’s surface, which has gradually separate from the underlying rock and now hangs like wallpaper from the cave’s walls and ceilings read more arrow
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Home to the largest emblematic circular painting in Germany, the Panorama Museum overlooks the spa town of Bad Frankenhausen. It’s here that the 123-meter-long monumental “Early Bourgeois Revolution in Germany” painting by Werner Tübke is displayed and it stands as one of the most impressive and controversial paintings in recent art history read more arrow
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One of Germany’s largest gardens and leisure parks, the egapark sprawls across the 265-meter-high Cryiaksberg in the southwest of Erfurt. Originally established as a city fortress, the area was transformed into a public green space in the late-19th century before it became the venue for the International Horticultural Exhibition from 1961 read more arrow
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