South America Attractions

Places to visit, points of interest and top things to see in South America

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Rio Carnival
* Very crowded but may be part of the experience
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Traveling around the world, in search of the most famous, exciting, and down right fun places to visit, Rio de Janeiro's Carnival would be one of the finest and most important stops in Brazil. 

The Rio Carnival coincides with the 40 days before Lent. Because during Lent, Roman Catholics are supposed to abstain from all bodily pleasures, the Carnival is held as a lead up to this season. The Carnival is celebrated during the days before Lent and is celebrated as a profane event. It is believed that the origins of the Carnival are set in the pagan Saturnalia, which is considered to be of the flesh and of pleasures, which truly makes the Carnival a send-off of these pleasures. 

The Carnival in Rio holds a great history in itself. Until it was recognized as being an expression of culture by the government, citizens who did not participate in the Carnival used to riot and protest its existence. The roots of the modern Rio Carnival are found in the 1800s when the rich people in the city started to hold balls and masquerade parties, ideas that came from the rich in Paris... read more arrow

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Machu Picchu
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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Located high above the Urubamba Valley in Peru, the Incan city of Machu Picchu is the most popular tourist attraction in the country. This ancient city dates back to the fifteenth century and was built on the order of the first ruler of the Incan empire, known as the Sapa Inca Pachacuti. The city was inhabited for over one hundred years until Peru was conquered by the Spanish in 1532. The city was then lost for several hundred years, and subsequently re-discovered by Western civilization in 1911, when an American historian named Hiram Bingham was shown the site by locals.

The exact function of the city is uncertain. The city is just five miles square and was inhabited by less than one thousand people. It is thought by some archeologists that the city may have been a kind of country retreat for Incan nobility. Others see the site as a base which was established as an "Ilacta" – a settlement from which the Sapa could maintain control over conquered regions... read more arrow

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Iguazu Falls
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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The spectacular South American Iguazu Falls, which are located along the border of Brazil and Argentina, are considered a UNESCO World Natural Heritage Site. These falls are much taller (or longer, however you want to look at it) than Niagara Falls, and are nearly four times as wide, with an impressive 275 different cascades and individual waterfalls plunging down about 270 feet into the gorge below. The falls stretch out along a vast, crescent-shaped cliff for two and a half miles along the Iguazu River. 

If you visit Iguazu Falls—which formed from a volcanic eruption leaving a massive crack in the earth—during South America's rainy season (between the months of November and March), you'll be lucky enough to watch the water flowing over the falls at a rate of up to a whopping 450,000 cubic feet per second; that's a lot of water flowing down very quickly! Normally, the water plummets downward at a rate slightly above 550 cubic feet per second, which is still a sight very impressive and stunning to behold... read more arrow

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Galapagos Islands
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A Galapagos Island tour, about 1,000 km off the western coast of Ecuador, offers a thoroughly unique experience. The only water park is the ocean, and the only rides have sails or two wheels. There is no place like them anywhere else on Earth. The Galapagos Islands off the coast of Ecuador could be among the last truly unexplored frontiers on the planet. The forbidding volcanic islands are part of Ecuador's national park system, and much of their land area is completely off-limits to tourists and explorers. Groups and tours in the area are confined to no more than twenty visitors under the guidance of a trained naturalist. 

The Ecuadorian government, in concert with the Charles Darwin Foundation for the Galapagos, keeps a close eye on the fragile ecosystem of the islands, preserving it in as natural a state as possible for future generations. The Galapagos Islands were made famous by Charles Darwin, and helped him form his theories of evolution... read more arrow

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Corcovado & Christ The Redeemer Statue
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"Corcovado" means hunchback and that is how this granite hill looks like. Its original name is Pinaculo da Tentacao or Pinnacle of Temptation. Corcovado with the Redemptor statue and a set of equally enchanting attractions are to be found in central Rio de Janeiro in Brazil. This peak towers over the city with its 710 meters in height. You can see Corcovado, even from a distance. 

The image of Christ the Redeemer Statue atop Corcovado is quintessentially Rio de Janeiro. You can see the soaring 38-meter high icon of Christ in many a postcard of the city and of Brazil itself. Its arms are outstretched as if it is embracing the city. That's a thirty-meter hug that seems to provide a 24-hour welcome to the city's visitors. At the foot of the statue is an observation deck where you can enjoy great views of Rio de Janeiro sights, such as Ipanema and Copacabana beaches, the Sugarloaf Mountain, the marvelous Lagoa Rodrigo de Freitas, and even downtown Rio... read more arrow

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Angel Falls
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Spilling out from its lofty height of some 980 meters, the water at Angel Falls provides much of the beauty of this, the tallest waterfall in the world. It shows you a fascinating example of the powerful force of nature, which is now considered among the eight natural wonders of the world.

Its height makes it 15 times higher than Niagara Falls. What's more, it has an uninterrupted drop of 807 meters. The mere fact that the water is falling at such a lofty height and that strong winds buffet the water as it falls, turns the water into mist even before it gets into the ground. From below, you can see a rainbow shimmering in the mist as it plays with the light of the tropical sun. The sight, along with the sound of thundering waters, is a soothing, relaxing attraction.

The waters plummet off a flat table mountain and spill out onto a small creek that wends its way into the Churun River, which is a tributary of the Carrao River... read more arrow

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Amazon Rainforest
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The increasing attention that is given to the state of the world's environment has sparked interest in ecotourism – tours that serve people who want to see the wild places of the earth while reducing the environmental impact of their visits. The development of a tourist destination usually involves the construction of hotels, restaurants, and the corresponding infrastructure of roads and services to maintain them. These can leave a heavy imprint on the local environment, including on the indigenous population. The intent of responsible ecotourism is to reduce that impact to the minimum possible and give travelers a true sense of what the natural environment of the area they've chosen to visit is like.

Ecotourism in the earth's lungs

One of the top destinations for eco-tourists is the Amazon basin. This vast rainforest ecosystem has remained largely unchanged through the ages, having never been affected by the Ice Ages; it stands as an example of an area that is the same as it was 100 million years ago, even though it is threatened by human development and industrial encroachment on a grand scale... read more arrow

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Lake Titicaca
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The Lake Titicaca is one of the most spectacular, high altitude, Lake in the world.

This famous natural attraction straddles two countries – the borders of both Peru and Bolivia. The lake is one of South America's largest, by virtue of its volume. It is also 3,812 meters above sea level, making it one of the highest navigable lakes in the world. The turquoise waters are cold (some may even say icy), but this does not detract from the lake's natural beauty.

Lake Titicaca covers some 3,305 square miles and is fed by quite a number of sources, chief of which are the Rivers Coata, Huancane, Ramis, Suchez and Ilave, as well as some smaller rivers. Other sources include water from glaciers and rainfall. Lake Titicaca has two sub-basins – the Lago Grande (or Lago Chuchuito) and the smaller Lago Huiñaimarca (also called Lago Pequeño). These basins are connected by the Tiquina Strait... read more arrow

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Easter Island
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Walking with the statues on Easter Island

Shimmering luminous days on an island thousands of miles from anywhere…
Unspoiled natural beauty in a tropical island setting – without the bright lights and frenetic pace of a typical resort…
Mysterious statues that walked to their resting places and a more mysterious culture that erected them…

These are just a few of the attractions of the beautiful, mysterious island of Rapa Nui, better known to most of us as Easter Island. Located in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, Rapa Nui is over 3,000 km from the central coast of Chile and 1900 km from the closest inhabited island, making it one of the most remote places in the world. The small island – only about 46 square miles in area – is nearly a perfect triangle whose longest side is 24 km, and is only 12 km wide at its widest. Yet within that tiny space exists the luminous beauty of a natural sanctuary and one of the best-known mysteries of the ancient world – the mysterious Moai – the statues of Easter Island.

Made famous by Thor Heyerdahl's books Kon Tiki and Aku-Aku, there are 887 known moai on the island. The enormous stone statues are carved of tuff, an easily compressed volcanic ash. They weigh as much as 75 tonnes, and among the enduring mysteries of Easter Island is the question of who carved them, and how they got from their birthplace at the center of the island to the coasts of the island where they were meant to stand guard... read more arrow
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La Mitad del Mundo
* Crowded with tourists
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La Mitad del Mundo in Ecuador features a curious attraction – it lies smack in the middle of the world, which is exactly what La Mitad del Mundo means. La Mitad is to be found beyond the Pomasqui village, near the village of San Antonio del Pichincha. There is a long avenue there that features a monument that they say lies on the equator, or near it. This is where you go if you want to see the earth's waistline. Now, this is your chance to be in two places at the same time – to straddle to hemispheres. This is something you cannot do any place else.

The monument marking the equator features a bright red line and a huge globe mounted on a square pedestal. This monument is made of concrete and iron, with andesite stones as covering. The globe weighs five tons and has a diameter of 4.5 meters. There is a sign that proudly announces "Latitude Oo. You can ride the elevator to the top of the 30-meter tall monument for an entrancing view of the surrounding hills... read more arrow
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Sugar Loaf Mountain
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Glide along the city of Rio de Janeiro aboard one of the cable cars from Sugar Loaf Mountain. Pao de Acucar (or Sugar Loaf Mountain) is one of the popular attractions to be found in Rio de Janiero. Through the years, it has served as an important landmark, guiding the first Portuguese safely into Guanabara Bay. Even now, it beckons, inviting visitors to climb the top and enjoy the exhilarating mountain air, as well as the spectacular vistas of surrounding mountains and the cityscapes below.

With a height of 396 meters above sea level, it affords some of the most gorgeous views of Rio de Janeiro. It is actually composed of quartz and granite. Sugar Loaf Mountain rises straight from the edge of the water.

It has since been visited by millions of tourists who were attracted to its unique shape. The mountain's shape reminds one of a sugar loaf... read more arrow
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Monserrate
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Laguna Colorada
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The Laguna Colorada is located in the Andean plateaus of Bolivia, just southwest of it. It is within Eduardo Avaroa Andean Fauna National Reserve near the Chilean border. It is a 60-square kilometer shallow salt lake that has white borax islands that provide good contrast to all that red water. The shoreline is also bordered by white deposits composed of gypsum, sodium, borax and magnesium.

The lake is famous for its brilliant and unique coloration – bright red due to the algae that exists in abundance in its waters. Such phenomena also occur in other areas, such as in the Arctic islands in Canada. These lakes also have a pastel rainbow of colors, depending on the kind of algae that exists in the lake or lagoon.

Laguna Colorada's unique red hue has earned it a place as part of the Ramsar Wetlands of International Importance... read more arrow
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Alpayamo
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Alpamayo Mountain Peak in Peru is a place of ethereal beauty and splendor. At its peak, you may just reach the "roof of the world". It has the distinction of being voted as "the most beautiful peak in the world". And UNESCO concurs with this vote. This moniker is well earned, as it has an extraordinary pyramidal shape. Many a mountaineer come here yearly in an attempt to scale its picturesque and yet difficult peak. From the top, it's a sheer drop of around 450 meters – a challenge that sounds like an invitation to climbing enthusiasts all around the world. One look at it and avid climbers will want to pack their bags and go up, up, up! But, to get to the top, you will need experience in technical climbing as well as in high altitude performance.

Alpamayo Mountain is located in Peru's Ancash region at the northernmost edge of the Cordillera Blanca – a mountain range of the Peruvian Andes... read more arrow
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Beagle Channel
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One of the great destinations in Argentina is the Beagle Canal, the climate is relatively consistent year-round, and it has some great activities for travels, as well as amazing landscapes for photographers. The best vacation along this area is taking a cruise from Ushuaia through the canal, bays, and islets, plus there are plenty of great animals, birds, and places to see.

Some of the sights and activities around the Beagle Canal include the following:

• One of the best activities to see the Beagle Canal up close is via a cruise. It also allows passengers to see many of the birds along the Isla de Los Pajaros and the Isla de Los Lobos.

• Seafaring travelers will have a great time sailing on the catamarans or sailboats that can be rented for experienced sailors, or three-hour tours are also available for those less experienced sailors who also enjoy being on the water. Be sure to watch for sea lions

• Hikers will thoroughly enjoy a long hike around one of the islands... read more arrow

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Salar de Uyuni
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Salar de Uyuni Lake in southwest Bolivia covers a space of over 10,000 square kilometers and is the largest salt flat in the world. It is perched close to the crest of the Andes, over 3,500 meters high. At the Salar de Uyuni, what you see is a stretch of white, with remote purple hills (which are actually active volcanoes!) dotting the horizon. It is, by far, one of most exotic, even surreal, destinations in Bolivia. A view of this scene is very much like something from a dream.

Now, the fact that this vast tract is made up of salt (and not ice, snow or water) is fascinating. Salar de Uyuni originally was a huge saltwater lake or probably an inland sea, but mysteriously, the water vanished and only the salt remained. The result? Aside from the Uyuni Salt flats, there is also the Coipasa Salt Flat (which is smaller), as well as Lake Poopo and Lake Titicaca.

That is, around 10 billion tons of salt, twenty-five times more than the amount of salt in Utah's Bonneville Salt Flats... read more arrow
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Savor the peace and calm in Ria Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Lagoa Rodrigo de Freitas is just the right place for you to do so. The lake is a calming mixture of park, recreation area and picturesque scenes. This is where the locals go to escape the hustle and bustle of life in the city. It is surrounded by what is considered the "affluent South Side" of the city, such as Ipanema, Jardim Botanico, Copacabana, Leblon and Gavea.

The lake is 7.5 kilometers in circumference and is surrounded by the mountains of Tijuca NP. The magnificent Cristo Redentor statue atop Corcovado Mountain can be seen from here. The lake provides you with access to the Reboucas Tunnel, which goes all the way to the northern zone of the city. Mind you, the view going from the tunnel and out into the lake is simple unforgettable.

Lagoa Rodrigo de Freitas is the lagoon that limits great part of the city's south zone (Zona Sul): Ipanema, Leblon, Jardim Botanico, Gavea and Corte do Cantagalo (way to Copacabana)... read more arrow
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Tierra del Fuego
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The Land of Fire – that is Tierra del Fuego, one of the hottest destinations in this side of Chile and Argentina. Tierra del Fuego is full of promise – its many islands entice you to their shores, into an adventure unlike any other. It really is a combination of fire and ice. It is near the Antarctic Polar Circle, while also belonging to the southern end of the American continent. Its great contrasts form part of its attraction – perfectly blending the desolate with the magnificent, the majestic with the lowly and ordinary. Its perpetually snow-capped mountains, waterfalls, cliffs and verdant valleys make it one of the destinations you should discover.

It was on 1520 when Magellan first sighted its shores. This became the start of Tierra del Fuego's introduction to the Western world. It was named as such because as Magellan passed these isles, he saw a number of fires along the coastline... read more arrow
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If you want the beauty of the Caribbean without its crowds, then Los Roques Archipelago, Venezuela, is the place for you. This virgin haven has remained relatively undiscovered, and thus, it was able to maintain its natural beauty. Let your hair down and laze under the tropical sun without being disturbed by a crowd. You can just leave your troubles behind and immerse yourself in quiet walks along the shore or indulge in a variety of water sports. Get yourself a cooler and a picnic basket and drop by any of the isolated beaches and relax the day away.

This National Park is among the biggest marine park in the Caribbean Sea, with 546 acres of coverage. The archipelago is located north of the Venezuelan capital – Caracas. It is home to white, sandy beaches, relaxing azure waters and unique flora and fauna. The archipelago was declared a National Park in the 1970s so that the creatures living there are protected, as well as coral reefs, sea grass beds and mangroves located there... read more arrow
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Come to Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janiero, Brazil and be absolutely entertained by the city's dynamic and fully energized district. Its golden beaches and azure waters, along with the playful and adventurous culture draws more than two million visitors the world over. And, as you experience Copacabana Beach for yourself, you will come to understand why it is one of the most popular beaches in the world.

The area is named after the patron saint of Bolivia, our Virgin Lady of Copacabana. It lies at the foot of the hills of spectacular Rio de Janiero, at its southern part. It spans the area from Lifeguard Watchtower Six down to Princesa Isabel Avenue. As for the beach, it is 4 kilometers of pristine coastline, starting from lifeguard watchtower two down to lifeguard watchtower six. Copacabana lies in between Ipanema and Leblon.

Everyday, you will see ladies and gents lazing and sunbathing, playing volleyball and beach soccer and just plainly, letting their hair down... read more arrow
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The Lake District of Argentina is in Patagonia's northernmost point, and has some of the most spectacular scenery with snow-capped mountains, and beautifully clear lakes. This area truly gets the traveler back to the basics of nature.

Some of the wonderful scenery and activities that travelers can participate in along Argentina's beautiful Lake District include:

• The Parque Nacional Nahuel Huapi is one of the most popular National Parks in Argentina and is perfect for hikers in the summer and skiers in the wintertime to see some of the most remarkable surroundings.

• The Arrayán is located in the Nacional Los Arrayanes Parque with exceptionally beautiful flora in the summer time and a great place for hikers who enjoy some challenging peaks such as Volcano Lanin.

• The beautiful city of Bariloche is quite picturesque and is located at Nahuel Lake and offers some great skiing for the outdoor adventurers as well as some great nightlife for those more inclined to the indoor activities... read more arrow
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In northwestern Argentina in the San Juan province lays the remarkable national park and geological formation of Valle de la Luna – Ischigualasto. It's close to the border of Chile and also borders the Talampaya National Park in La Rioja. It's part of the Pampean Hills and features some amazing scenery, and it's historically important.

There are a variety of things to do in this Valle de la Luna – Ischigualasto, such as:

• Paleontologists, and dinosaur lovers, will find some of the oldest known dinosaur bones from the late Triassic period and it provides an incredible study of the ancient mammals of the time as well.

• This is also a World Heritage Site with some of the most amazing rock formations of any place in the world in the Talampaya National Park gorge that has natural rock formation walls that ruse up to 469 feet high and are 262 feet at its most narrow... read more arrow
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The Nahuel Huapi National Park was set up in 1934 and is Argentina's oldest and largest national park. In the midst of the park stands the Nahuel Huapi Lake at the foothills of the Patagonian Andes. It spans an area of 7,050 sq. km and comprises three geographical zones—the Altoandino with perennial snow at an altitude of 5,200 ft, the Andino-Patagónico at lower levels and the Patagonian steppe. The dominant parts of this park are the Andes Mountains, lakes, waterfalls, rives, snowy peaks, glaciers and lush green forests. Chile lies on its west side.

The park has rich flora and fauna. You'll find species such as coihue, lengas, ñires, Chilean cedar, Myrceugenella apiculata, Winter's bark, Lomatia ferruginea, Lomatia hirsuta, Alstroemeria aurantica, Fuchsia megellanica, Patagonian cypress, ferns, arrayanes and caña colihue reeds, arvejillas and amancayes... read more arrow
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The Perito Moreno Glacier is located in the Los Glaciares National Park, south-west Santa Cruz province, Argentina. It is one of the most important attractions of the Argentine Patagonia. It has an area of 250 sq km, is 30 km long and is one of the 48 glaciers the Southern Patagonian Ice Field feeds from the Andes Mountains. This ice field is the world's No. 3 largest fresh water reserve.

Due to the accessibility and size of the Perito Moreno glacier, it is a really big tourist attraction in south Patagonia. It is the epitome of natural beauty and the magnificence of Argentina. It's a necessary stop for any tourist in this area due to the glacier's unique size, breathtaking sights, significance and easy accessibility.

Here, you can see its breathtaking sights and a glacier wall with several ice towers measuring 4km in length and 60m in height with several sounds of icebergs in the lake... read more arrow
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Near El Chaltén village is Monte Fitz Roy, located near the south Patagonian Ice Field, Patagonia, Argentina. It is known variously as Cerro Chaltén, Cerro Fitz Roy and Mount Fitz Roy. Though just half the sizes of the Himalayas, trekkers here find it extremely difficult to climb the granite faces of these mountains. It lies in the northern part of the magnificent Parque Nacional Los Glaciers, part of the largest icecap outside of the polar region, called Hielo Sur. Monte Fitz Roy is a trail that begins in the plains and rises gradually till it meets the Andes. It is located in the Los Glacieres National Park and takes about a week's trek to complete.

The highest mountain in the Los Glacieres National Park, Mount Fitz Roy is about 3,405 m in height while its closest competitor, Cerro Torre, is just 3,128 m in height. These mountains are best climbed between November and February... read more arrow
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At the heart of Argentina's wine making industry is Mendoza Province, responsible for a large majority of the major wineries here. Today, this region has emerged as a brilliant wine destination of this country.

Grape varieties: Situated in the eastern foothills of the Andes, vineyards are planted at a height of 1,970–3,610 feet above sea level. The main wine producing areas are Maipú and Luján where the pink-skinned grapes, the Criolla Grande and Cereza, are grown. However, the pride of this region is the Malbec variety, closely followed by Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay and Tempranillo.

Weather conditions: Mendoza is ideally located for a wine producing region as it is flanked by the Andes range, while also enjoying sea breezes of Chile. Mendoza also enjoys semi-arid desert and a Continental climate. Because this region has four fixed seasons with moderate temperature and eight inches of rainfall, grapes grow well here... read more arrow
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On the Northeastern coast of Patagonia in Argentina, lays one of the most beautiful places in the world called the Valdez Peninsula and in 1999 it was listed by UNESCO as one of the World Heritage Sites. It is relatively close to Puerto Madryn, and for those who truly want to get away from it all, this is the ideal spot.

Nature lovers will absolutely love some of the things to see and do in this remarkable Valdez Peninsula include:

• For whale loves, this is one of the best (of the very limited places) to get a good viewing of the Southern Right Whales, as well as Orcas, between May and December. Make sure to have cameras ready and look for their babies during this time as well.

• Sea Lions, Elephant Seals, and Fur Seals are also abundant in Golfo Nuevo and Golfo San José.

• Bird watchers will thoroughly enjoy this area because it populated with Magellanic Penguins – they are fascinating to watch their antics, and there are around 181 other bird species found on this peninsula... read more arrow
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Colca Canyon in southern Peru has twice the depth of Arizona's Grand Canyon, with over 3,000 meters at its deepest. It begins high in the Andes and is a land of rich history, as the area used to be inhabited by Cabanas and Collagues. In fact, there are still traces of majestic Inca and pre-Inca terraces that hark back to over 1,000 years. The word Colca actually means smalls holes that were dug in the cliffs of the canyon and the valley. These holes were used to store the pre-Incan and Incan people's food, as well as to bury important people.

The valley is sometimes dubbed "The Valley of Wonders", as it is replete with natural geological attractions – gorges, volcanoes and agricultural slopes or terraces. Colca Canyon is also famed for being the home of the Andean condors. The species, whose scientific name is Vultur gryphus, is one of the endangered species and there have been concerted efforts to save the species... read more arrow
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Northwestern Argentina seems to have an abundance of some of the most amazing scenery in the world, and the Quebrada de Humahuaca is a narrow valley in the Jujuy province, lying 932 miles north of Buenos Aires. It's a 96 mile log valley that has a border by the Sub Andean hills to the east and the high plains Altiplano at the widest point of the Andes.

There are a variety of activities in the Quebrada de Humahuaca, including:

• The town of Humahuaca is a main town of this long valley whose most famous feature is the Church's clock tower with the figure of Saint Francisco Solano that comes out and makes the sign of the cross at noon every day when the clock chimes 12.

• Paleontologist will find the areas fascinating since it has been populate for over 10,000 years, and the prehistoric remains of the hunter-gatherers are abundant.

• With a rich history, this area was a Camino for the Incas during the 15th century that was well known for the battles during the Spanish War of Independence... read more arrow
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A barrio or neighborhood of Argentina's capital city, Buenos Aires, La Boca is very European in its appearance since its early settlers were from Genoa, Italy. It is one of Buenos Aires's 48 barrios and is located in the southeast part of the city, near its old port. Most people residing here are chiefly Spanish, Italian, French, German, Basque and Arab.

Walk down the road and discover the city's pedestrian arts and crafts. Or take a river cruise; or watch Tango dancers on cobbled streets. You can also take a row boat to Avellaneda.

Here are a few things that you just can't miss…

Clara Chevalier Museum: Ms. Chevalier herself takes you around this museum, giving you a tour in Spanish. Her museum comprises her paintings, housed in her bedroom recreated and an old conventillo which housed six families. From this museum, you get a sense of life many decades ago, though much of the museum showcases her art and youth... read more arrow
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The Carioca Aqueduct holds not just water but generations of history. It is a vital part of the Rio de Janeiro landscape and is a testimony of Brazil's brilliance combined in engineering and colonial architecture. When in this, the most quirky and fascinating of Brazil's cities, you just have to experience Arcos da Lapa via a ride in its tram. The sight of the 42 monumental arches towering over the Santa Teresa neighborhood is simply astounding. These arches extend from Santo Antonio to Santa Teresa. All in all, the aqueduct stretches to 270 meters in length. Also, the highest of the arches soars at a height of 17.6 meters. Indeed, very impressive and a sight you will truly remember Rio de Janeiro by.

Also known as the Arcos da Lapa, the Carioca Aqueduct was built in the mid-18th century. It was used to provide fresh water to the city... read more arrow

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You can also rate and vote for your favorite South America sightseeing places, famous historical landmarks, and best things to do in South America by visiting the individual South America attraction pages.