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Top 25 Tourist Attractions in Germany

  • 7.7 /10
    The Reichstag thumbnail
    Part of the Reichstag building in Berlin.
    Constructed to house the Imperial Diet of the German Empire, the Reichstag was created as a massive Neo-Renaissance palace, with the Emperor himself's foundation stone in 1884. It opened ten years later but was severely damaged after being set on fire in 1933. In the aftermath of World War II, the building largely fell into disuse, with the German Democratic Republic parliament meeting in East Berlin’s Palast der Republik and the Bundestag parliament of the Federal Republic of Germany meeting in Bonn’s Bundeshaus ...

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  • Gottorf Castle thumbnail
    The exterior of the Gottorf Castle.
    Located on an island in the Schlei, a narrow inlet of the Baltic Sea, Schloss Gottorf is a historic castle estate that served as the House of Oldenburg's ancestral home. It lies just a couple of kilometers from the Old Town of Schleswig and boasts two of the state’s most significant museums. The island was first settled as an estate in the 12th century as Bishop Occo of Schleswig's residence before being transferred to the Count of Holstein of the House of Schauenburg in 1340 ...

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  • Brandenburg Gate thumbnail
    The top of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin.
    Built by Prussian king Frederick William II during the early Batavian Revolution, the Brandenburg Gate is one of Germany's most iconic landmarks. This 18th-century Neoclassical sandstone monument was modeled on the Acropolis in Athens and is located at the start of the road that extends from Berlin to Brandenburg an der Havel. It lies just to the west of the Pariser Platz and provides a monumental entry to Unter den Linen (the boulevard of linden trees), which once led directly to the City Palace of the Prussian monarchs ...

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  • Mainz Cathedral thumbnail
    The exterior of the Mainz Cathedral in Germany.
    Nestled in the historic heart of Mainz is St. Martin’s Cathedral, a 1000-year-old cathedral that serves as the episcopal see of the Bishop of Mainz. Its soaring towers dominate the pedestrianized Old Town's half-timbered houses, and it represents the high point of Romanesque cathedral architecture in Germany ...

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  • Eekholt Wildlife Park thumbnail
    Deers in the Eekholt Wildlife Park.
    Located on the northern edge of the Segeberger Forest between the towns of Bad Bramstedt and Bad Segeberg, the Eekholt Wildlife Park is home to around 100 different species of native wildlife. It showcases the animals in their natural habitats while raising awareness about sustainability in nature. The Eekholt Wildlife Park was founded in 1970 and is still privately run to this day. It was created to convey awareness about plants, animals, and humans' ecological interdependence, with diagrams and exhibits illustrating the role each plant or animal plays in maintaining the ecological balance ...

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  • Neuschwanstein Castle thumbnail
    Neuschwanstein Castle exterior in Bavaria, Germany.
    The Neuschwanstein Castle, located in Germany's Bavarian region, is the ultimate when you are thinking of fantasy castles. It is the quintessential 19th-century romantic palace. 
    Commissioned by King Ludwig II of Bavaria as a retreat and homage to Richard Wagner, Neuschwanstein Castle is one of the world’s most photographed royal residences ...

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  • Maybach and Zeppelin bunker complex thumbnail
    A tunnel in the Maybach and Zeppelin bunker complex.
    Built to house the High Command of the Army and the Supreme Command of the Armed Forces during World War II, the Maybach I and II were a cluster of above and below ground bunkers built near Zossen in Brandenburg. They were named after the Maybach automobile engine, and together with the nearby military complex, they played an instrumental role in the planning of field operations for the Wehrmacht, connecting the military with civilians along the front lines ...

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  • Stretching for 98 kilometers through the countryside of Schleswig-Holstein, the Kiel Canal links the North Sea with the Baltic Sea between the towns of Brunsbüttel and Kiel. It was built in the late 19th century to prevent ships from having to make the much longer journey around the northern tip of Denmark and was originally called the Kaiser-Wilhelm Canal. The first connection between the North and Baltic Seas was the Eider Canal that was completed under the reign of Christian VII of Denmark in 1784 ...

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  • 7 /10
    Germany's largest Mountain, the Zugspitze forms part of the Wetterstein Alpine mountain range that straddles the border with Austria. It lies just south of the town of Garmisch-Partenkirchen, with its summit soaring to 2,962 meters and renowned for its gilded cross and magnificent views. On a clear day, Zugspitze boasts panoramas across four different countries and as far as the Eastern Alps, with the peaks ranging in height from 2,000-4,000 meters ...

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  • Sprawling along the border between Germany and the Czech Republic, the Bavarian Forest is an extensive area of woodland that once covered much of southern Germany. During Roman times it was known as the Hercynian Forest and today extends across the same mountain range as the Bohemian Forest in the Czech Republic. It includes the walking trails of the Bavarian Forest National Park (the first of its kind in Germany), the Bavarian Forest Nature Park and the Eastern Bavarian Forest Nature Park, as well as the ski slopes of the Great Arber ...

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  • One of the most popular resort towns in the Bavarian Alps is Berchtesgaden, which lies at one end of the German Alpine Highway. Soaring mountains surround the town on all sides and have long drawn hikers and sightseers, including Adolf Hitler who built his Eagle’s Nest retreat here. Follow the 6.5-kilometer-long Kehlsteinstrasse (a private road built for Adolf Hitler) to the Kehlsteinhaus (Eagle’s Nest), which now features a restaurant boasting panoramic views of the region ...

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  • Originally established in 1679 as a herb garden for the Royal Palace, the Berlin-Dahlem Botanical Gardens are now one of the largest and most important of their kind in the world. They sprawl across more than 100 acres in the Lichterfelde area of Berlin, with around 22,000 different plant species represented. The Berlin-Dahlem Botanical Gardens as they are known today were designed under the guidance of architect Adolf Engler, with the main purpose of displaying exotic plant species brought back from Germany’s colonies ...

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  • Situated between the River Spree and the Kupfergraben, Museum Island is a UNESCO World Heritage Site that’s packed with many of Berlin’s most important cultural institutions. It’s here that the historic Altes Museum is found, having been built in 1830 to house the Crown Jewels, as well as the Neues Museum that was established in 1855 and rebuilt following World War II. It was designed to house collections that could not fit in the Altes Museum, including ancient Egyptian artifacts and the ethnographic collection, and stands as an important monument to the innovations that were taking place in building construction during the mid-19th century ...

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  • Established in 1961 to help stem the flow of refugees from East Germany to West Germany, the Berlin Wall has become synonymous with the city. When it was torn down in 1989, the graffiti-covered wall extended for 155 kilometers and rose four meters high, with almost 300 observation towers and more than 50 bunkers. Today just a small stretch of the wall has been preserved as part of the Berlin Wall Memorial, which was established by the Federal Republic of Germany and the Federal State of Berlin in 1998 ...

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  • Of note is the Haus am Checkpoint Charlie, a museum dedicated to what was the best-known crossing point between East and West Berlin. Checkpoint Charlie was the name given by Western Allies to the crossing during the Cold War (1947-1991) and it was here that Soviet and American tanks came face-to-face during the Berlin Crisis of 1961 ...

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  • Once the most important residence for German royalty, Charlottenburg Palace is a lavish, 17th-century estate and the largest palace in Berlin. It is renowned for its opulent baroque and rococo interiors that include a 50-meter-high central dome, as well as a stunning formal garden surrounded by woodlands. It was the wife of Friedrich III, Sophie Charlotte, who originally commissioned the palace and it was designed by architect Johann Arnold Nering ...

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  • Stretching from the Brandenburg Gate to the Lustgarten, Unter den Linden is Berlin’s most famous street. Its name translates as “Under the Lime Trees Avenue” and it began as a 16th-century riding track for royalty to go hunting in the Tiergarten. It was formally established in 1647 when its famous lime trees were planted and now features a grassed pedestrian mall and two broad carriageways on either side ...

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  • Originally used as a hunting reserve for Berlin royalty, the Grosser Tiergarten was transformed into a public oasis in 1700 and now spans more than 500 acres of English-style parklands. It’s planted with an abundance of trees, large expanses of grassy lawns and picturesque floral borders, as well as being home to a number of important monuments. These include a late-19th-century statue of Queen Luise and a monument to Frederick Wilhelm III that features reliefs illustrating his peaceful reign ...

    Read more about the Grosser Tiergarten and the Victory Column

  • Nicknamed “the hollow tooth” by Berliners, the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church is one of Berlin’s most interesting landmarks and located on the Kurfürstendamm in the center of Breitscheidplatz. It includes the damaged spire of a late-19th-century church, as well as a modern church and belfry dating to the 1960s. The original church was built by Kaiser Wilhelm II, countering the socialist and labor movements taking place in Germany during the late-19th century with a Protestant church-building programme that sought a return to traditional religious values ...

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  • One of Berlin’s largest squares, the Gendarmenmarkt is a charismatic corner of the city and a popular meeting point for both locals and tourists. It’s flanked by three historic buildings - the Konzerthaus, the Französischer Dom and the Berliner Dom - and was named after a regiment of the Gendarmerie that once had their stables here. The Gendarmenmarkt was originally laid out at the end of the 17th century as the Linden-Markt and created by Johann Arnold Nering, with Georg Christian Unger reconstructing the square in 1773 ...

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  • The largest model railway in the world, Miniatur Wunderland features more than 12,000 meters of track and almost 900 different trains, set within Hamburg’s historic warehouse district of Speicherstadt. It includes areas dedicated to railways of the United States and Scandinavia, as well as different regions across Germany. In addition to its railways and trains, Miniatur Wunderland also features meticulously recreated airports, planes, buildings and humans, all of which are illuminated by more than 300,000 lights ...

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  • Nicknamed the “Gateway to the World”, the Port of Hamburg is the largest in Germany and the second-busiest port in Europe. It was founded in 1189 by Frederick I due to its strategic location along the River Elbe and enabled Hamburg to emerge as a leading trade city in Central Europe. Today the Port of Hamburg (the Hamburger Hafen) is home to many of the city’s most famous attractions and ideally explored by boat tours that depart from Landungsbrücken ...

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  • Hamburg boasts a fascinating seafaring history and the best place to discover the maritime events and people that have shaped the city is at the International Maritime Museum. It’s housed in an immense red-brick heritage building in the HafenCity quarter of Hamburg and traces more than 3,000 years of maritime history through artifacts, model ships and artworks. The International Maritime Museum Hamburg is based around the private collection of Peter Tamm, which was begun in 1934 when he was just six years old ...

    Read more about the International Maritime Museum

  • * Regular pre-pandemic touristic activity level.

    You can also rate and vote for your favorite Germany sightseeing places, famous historical landmarks, and best things to do in Germany by visiting the individual Germany attraction pages.