Italy Attractions

Places to visit, points of interest and top things to see in Italy

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Canals of Venice
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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Thanks to its canals, Venice is known to be one of the most magical place on earth. The city is a testament to the ingenuity of the human spirit and invention. Stone buildings of great beauty sit on the water; boats of varying sizes traverse the canals the way cars, trucks, and buses crowd the streets of more conventional cities; crowds throng the bridges and narrow pedestrian streets.

If one wants to understand the history of Venice, the best starting point is to understand the canals themselves, and how their construction and history reflects and explains the city itself.

Although there are plenty of famous landmarks to feast your eyes on in Venice, its canals are rightfully considered to be one of the world's top attractions. The city counts more than 150 waterways which are also traversed by over 400 bridges.

The Grand Canal

The Grand Canal (“Canalasso”) stretches around 2 miles (3 kilometers) through the city in a giant “S” curve from the Santa Lucia train station to the Piazza San Marco and the stunning church of Santa Maria de Salute, at which point it is over 350 feet wide... read more arrow

8.1 /10
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Sistine Chapel
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The Sistine Chapel in Rome is named for Sixtus IV della Rovere, who was Pope from 1471 to 1484. The interior walls of the chapel are covered in exquisite frescoes painted by some of the greatest Italian artists in history, including Perugino, Botticelli, Ghirlandaio, Rosselli, and of course Michelangelo, who painted the stunning frescoes which adorn the ceiling. The chapel is not only a work of art; it is in fact still used as a site of papal religious activity—the election of a new Pope takes place in the chapel, at an event called a conclave.

The fresco style of painting was used throughout the chapel. The word is derived from the Italian affresco, meaning "fresh". Fresco painting is simply painting which is done on a surface of plaster, either wet or dry depending on the method a painter chooses. For the frescos of the Sistine Chapel, layers of wet plaster were applied to walls, and then painted over, allowing the pigments to soak into the plaster... read more arrow
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St. Peter's Square
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You are standing in a courtyard, surrounded by hundreds of other people who are equally awed by the majesty of the sights that you are all seeing. Before you, over 400 feet tall and almost 400 years old, rises the magnificent Saint Peter's Cathedral. As you turn to glance about the elliptical colonnade in wonder, you are greeted with the sight of hundreds of pillars holding up the ancient Baroque architecture. When your eyes reach the center of the square, you are greeted by the sight of an ancient Egyptian obelisk, dating back to the 13th century BC. To either side of the obelisk are fountains, and beyond it the road leading into the square. You are standing in Saint Peter's Square in Vatican City within Rome.

The architecture of Saint Peter's Square was designed to be awe inspiring, leading, as it does, up to the great Saint Peter's Cathedral (or the Basilica of Saint Peter). The design was by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, and the Square was built over time from 1656 to 1667 by order of Pope Alexander VII... read more arrow
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Villa Borghese
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The Villa Borghese is a large natural park in Rome. It contains a few buildings, attractions and hosts the Galleria Borghese museum. It's main entrance is through the upward leading path of the Spanish Steps.

Greek Temple
The area was a vineyard up until the In the 17th century. Then Scipione Borghese, Cardinal and nephew of the Pope Paul the fifth, turned the area into a splendid garden. The vineyards of the Villa Borghese were quite famously renowned. Then, in the 19th century, the garden was given an English refinement twist. At the begining of the 20th century, the park stopped being privately held and became a public place for locals and tourists alike.

Etruscan Museum
The original villa was built by Flaminio Ponzio, Cardinal Borghese's architect... read more arrow
7.9 /10
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Leaning Tower of Pisa
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The Pisa Tower, otherwise known as the Leaning Tower of Pisa, really was a labor of love, taking well over a hundred and fifty years to build. This tower is the campanile of the cathedral of Italy, which means that it is a freestanding bell tower. The tower is located in what is known as the field of Miracles (Campo dei Miracles), which is behind the actually cathedral's main building. The tower's most distinctive feature is that although it was designed to stand vertically, the tower's poorly laid foundation causes it to lean greatly toward the southeast. The lean angle is about 5.5 degrees, meaning that the top of the tower is over 4 meters from where it would be if the tower was correctly vertical.

Construction on the Pisa Tower began in August of 1173. At this time in history, Pisa (and Italy in general) was going through a period of military success, which means that money was flowing readily. During this first building period the foundation was laid and the first floor was constructed, according to the plans of the original architect, Bonanno Pisano... read more arrow
7.9 /10
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Roman Forum
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The Roman Forum, the heart of Rome. The citizens of ancient Rome spent a good part of their days there. The great place was surrounded with temples and legal buildings and filled with statues, bridges, arcs and columns. So the "Forum Romanum" was a remarkable marketplace center point for all business and shopping made by the ancient citizens of Rome.

The Forum was also used by Roman orators for public speaking. This created a shopping and trading ambiance that would get people stopping and listening. Many religious and festivals where also held at the Forum. It is also known to have been the cradle of the Latin population 26 centuries ago.

The creation of the forum, as market and public meeting space, was a roman integration of the Greek's agora. Forums also made their appearances in many other towns and Italy provinces... read more arrow

7.9 /10
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Florence's Duomo
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Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore
The skyline of Florence (Firenze), Italy wouldn't be the same without the stunning Cathedral or Duomo that so personifies the grandeur and elegance of the city. The Duomo, which translates to "the Cathedral" or "Dome Cathedral", has a long and regal history dating back to the end of the 13th century.

The Duomo's Architecture
Near the end of the thirteenth century, the government that oversaw the Republic of Florence decided to replace their under-sized, rather plain Santa Reparata with a more majestic worshipping house. Architect Arnolfo di Cambio was asked to design the building, sans dome. Residents of the Florentine Republic were to help finance the construction of the cathedral, as a tax was added to all estates of the deceased. On September 8, 1296, Arnolfo di Cambio laid the first brick on the land where The Duomo now stands.

While di Cambio preferred to create structures in the popular Gothic style of the time, his basilica was a wonderful marriage of Gothic and classical styles... read more arrow
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The Old Port of Genoa
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Trevi Fountain
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The Trevi Fountain is one of the most popular, and photographed, fountain in the world. This grand fountain, most likely the most beautiful one in Rome, is located in the Quirinale district and is clearly the masterpiece of the small Trevi square. "Trevi" is derived from the word "Trivium", meaning "where three streets meet". This monumental baroque Trevi Fountain is within a walking distance of the Piazza Navona and the Spanish Steps.

Neptune
Trevi Fountain History

The fountain was designed by the artist Nicola Salvi, who was commissioned by Pope Clement XII in 1732. Salvi based his designed on one that Bernini started one century earlier but he was halted after the death of Pope Urban VIII. It took about thirty years to build the fountain and it was finally completed in 1762... read more arrow

7.7 /10
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Spanish Steps
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The Spanish Steps is another very popular attraction that is located in the heart ("Centro Historico") of Rome. It is also one of Rome's favourite romantic spot and one of the most popular's city landmark.

The Spanish Steps has 138 steps that connects the Piazza di Spagna (or Spanish Square), one of the most elegant square, at the bottom to the Franciscan Trinità dei Monti church at a higher level. These nice and elegant steps were made by Francesco de Sanctis between 1723 and 1726. The Steps were built to create a nice path between the church on top of the hill and the Spanish embassy located on the Piazza below.

Spanish Steps with Flowers
The vibrant and stylish Piazza di Spagna is surrounded with 18th century buildings. Colourful flowers also gives the Spanish Steps an enhanced visitor experience... read more arrow
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St. Mark's Basilica
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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The Basilica di San Marco ("Saint Mark's Basilica" in English), right next to Saint Mark's Square and near the Doge's Palace, is the most famous of Venice's churches, and is among the world's best-known examples of Byzantine architecture. The basilica is today considered a living monument to the heritage of the Byzantine, Roman, and Venetian cultures.

The Basilica di San Marco has gone through many changes in its 1200-year history. It was initially constructed as a temporary building in 828, for the purpose of housing holy relics of Saint Mark the Evangelist, believed to have authored the Gospel of Mark. These were transported from their discovered location in Alexandria, Egypt, in 829. A permanent church was erected and consecrated in 832—this was rebuilt after being damaged by fire in 976, due to a revolt against the then Doge (leader) of Venice, Candiano IV. A second rebuilding of the church commenced in 1063, but it was not until 1094 that the church was consecrated. Since then, the core structure of the basilica has remained unchanged... read more arrow
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Saint Peter's Basilica in Vatican City, surrounded by the city of Rome, is a sight that delights the eye and captures wonder and beauty from every angle. With a dome that may have helped to inspire Saint Paul's Cathedral in London among others, Saint Peter's rises over Vatican City like a shining star.

The Saint Peter's Basilica, also known as the Basilica of Saint Peter, is the foremost place of worship of His Holiness, the Pope, who is the religious leader of the Catholic people. Public religious ceremonies officiated by the Pope are often performed within the Cathedral. This is primarily due to the size of the Cathedral, which can hold about 60,000 people, as well as the proximity of the Cathedral to the Papal Residence within Vatican City.

The Saint in question was Peter, one of the twelve apostles of Jesus Christ, first Bishop of Antioch, and later first Bishop of Rome. Legend has it that Saint Peter himself is buried under the altar stone, although there are no biblical references to Peter having been in Rome or having been martyred there... read more arrow
7.6 /10
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Rialto Bridge
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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One of the four bridges spanning the Grand Canal in Venice, the Rialto Bridge is the oldest and serves as the dividing line between the San Marco and San Polo districts. It began as a floating pontoon bridge built by Nicolò Barattieri in the late-12th century and was named Ponte della Moneta due to its proximity to the entrance of the mint. The Rialto Bridge is the main pedestrian access to Venice from the train station and most likely one of the first main tourist attractions to be recognized.

As traffic began to increase when the Rialto market flourished on the eastern bank of the canal, the pontoon was replaced by a more permanent wooden bridge in 1255. It featured two ramps that could be raised when tall ships needed to sail along the canal and was maintained through the rental of shops that were built along the sides of the bridge. But the Rialto Bridge was partially burnt down during a revolt in 1310 and later collapsed when a crowd gathered to watch a passing boat parade... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Ca' d'Oro (Palazzo Santa Sofia)
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Officially titled Palazzo Santa Sofia, the Ca’ d’Oro (or “Golden House”) is one of the oldest palaces on Venice’s Grand Canal. It was nicknamed due to the gilt and polychrome decorations that once adorned the walls, with delicate marble filigree by Bartolomeo Bon on the façade that would have made an undeniably impressive vision.

The Ca’ d’Oro was built by architects Giovanni Bon and his son, Bartolomeo Bon, between 1428 and 1430 for the wealthy Contarini family. It changed ownership numerous times following the fall of the Venetian Republic in 1797, with the ballet dancer Marie Taglioni and the baron Giorgio Franchetti both once owning it. Franchetti conducted extensive restorations of the palace, including the reconstruction of a Gothic stairway that Marie Taglioni had removed, and adorned its walls in his private art collection of Venetian masters.

Franchetti bequeathed the Ca' d'Oro to the Italian State in 1916, enabling the public access to this beautiful landmark of Venetian history... read more arrow

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Teatro La Fenice
* Crowded with tourists
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Considered one of "the most famous and renowned landmarks in the history of Italian theatre”, Teatro La Fenice is an opera house in the heart of Venice. It was here that some of the most celebrated operas were premiered during the 19th century, including those by composers such as Verdi, Bellini and Rossini.

Teatro La Fenice was constructed from 1790 to 1792 to replace the Teatro San Benedetto that had burned to the ground, with the name “La Fenice” referring to the opera company’s survival. It was inaugurated with an opera by Giovanni Paisiello entitled “I giuochi d’Agrigento”, with the libretto crafted by Alessandro Pepoli.

In December 1836, the theatre was again destroyed by fire and rebuilt on a design by brothers Tommaso and Giovanni Battista Meduna. It was at Teatro La Fenice that Giuseppe Verdi’s works “Ernani”, “Rigoletto” and “La Traviata” were premiered, while composers such as Stravinsky and Britten wrote pieces to be performed here for the First International Festival of Contemporary Music... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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The Iconic Gondola
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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An iconic symbol of Venice, gondolas are a traditional, flat-bottomed rowing boat that was once the preferred means for Venetians to get around the city’s canals. These wooden boats are made by hand in special workshops known as squeri, with some still in operation today. A ride in one of these remains one of the top things to do in Venice by tourists.

During the 17th and 18th centuries, it is estimated that there were between eight and ten thousand gondolas in the city, with vaporetti now the main means of getting around. Of the few hundred gondolas that remain, most are used in festival parades and local rowing competitions or by tourists wanting a romantic perspective of Venice.

Gondolas are traditionally colored black and many feature ornamentations, including comfortable seats and blankets for guests to stay warm. Gondoliers wear black pants and striped shirts and some will also offer information during the ride... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Scuola Grande di San Rocco
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Dating to the 16th century, the Scuola Grande di San Rocco is one of the most beautiful buildings in Venice. It was constructed from white marble to house a charitable society dedicated to San Rocco, regarded by many as a protector against the plague. It was designed like most other scuole in Venice, with two halls (one on the ground floor and the other above), with a staircase and landing topped by a dome connecting the two. Numerous architects worked on the building, including Bartolomeo Bon and his son Petro, as well as Sante Lombardo, Antonio Scarpagnino and Giangiacomo dei Grigi,

In 1564, soon after the scuola’s completion, the artist Tintoretto was commissioned to paint a central panel on the ceiling of the Sala dell’Albergo. He later adorned the walls and ceilings of both the Salla dell’Albergo and the Sala Superiore with a complete cycle of paintings, considered by many to be his greatest masterpiece... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Ca' Rezzonico
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Located on the Grand Canal in the Dorsoduro sestiere, Palazzo Rezzonico (also known as Ca' Rezzonico) is an opulent palace that provides a fascinating glimpse into 18th-century Venetian life. It was designed by the Baroque architect Baldassare Longhena, but not completed until 1756 (almost 100 years later) by Giorgio Massari.

The palace is set across three stories, with an opulent marble façade facing the Grand Canal and ornate Baroque decorations. Massari remained true to the original plans of Longhena, only adding a few of his own design elements to reflect architectural developments since the palazzo’s conception.

The Palazzo Rezzonico opened as a museum in 1936, bringing together objects from palazzi across Venice. It’s sumptuously furnished with Baroque and Rococo period pieces, silk wall coverings and Flemish tapestries, together with housing a museum that highlights the importance of luxury goods to the 18th-century Venetian economy... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Situated on the Campo dei Frari in the heart of the San Polo district, the Basilica di Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari is one of the most important churches in Venice. Affectionately known as the “Frari”, construction began on the church around 1340 by the Franciscans and its immense campanile (the second tallest in the city) was completed in 1396.

The Basilica di Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari is constructed from brick and one of three Venetian churches built in the Italian Gothic style. It is the only church in the city to still contain its original rood screen, an ornate partition between the chancel and nave.

The interior of Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari is in keeping with the minimalistic style of Franciscan churches. However, it does contain a number of artistic treasures that include the triptych “Madonna and Child Enthroned with Four Saints” by Giovanni Bellini in the sacristy and a wooden statue of St. John the Baptist by Florentine sculptor Donatello in the right transept... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Torcello Island
* Mildly touristic
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Considered the “parent island” of Venice, Torcello lies at the northern end of the Venetian Lagoon. It was first settled in the 5th century, developing into a bustling commercial town with its own cathedral by the 12th century and believed to be from where Venice’s population originated.

While it once contained palaces, churches, shipyards and docks, today there are only two churches and a small collection of homes remaining. Torcello’s cathedral is dedicated to Santa Maria Assunta and dates to 639 AD, and is considered the best example of Venetian-Byzantine architecture still standing today. It features beautiful mosaics lining the interior walls, including angels carrying a medallion depicting the Lamb of God and a mosaic of the Last Judgment from the early 13th century.

Be sure to admire the exquisite marble carvings throughout the interior and the 11th-century mosaic floor, together with a frieze of the Twelve Apostles surrounded by flowers... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Santa Maria dei Miracoli
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Nicknamed the “marble church”, Santa Maria dei Miracoli is one of the best-preserved examples of early Venetian Renaissance architecture. It was designed by Pietro Lombardo and built between 1481 and 1489 to enshrine a picture of the Virgin Mary, with the plans expanded in 1484 to include a new convent. The convent was built to house the nuns of St. Clare on the eastern edge of the church and connected by an enclosed walkway that no longer stands. Today Santa Maria dei Miracoli is one of the most popular places to be married in Venice because of its exquisite interior.

Santa Maria dei Miracoli is renowned for its magnificent colored marble facade that features delicate rosette, octagonal and cross patterns, with this intricate technique continued inside. The church boasts a golden domed ceiling that rises above the gray and coral marble walls, together with a beautifully decorated balustrade that is adorned with figures... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Lido di Venezia
* Mildly touristic
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Separating the Venetian Lagoon from the Adriatic Sea, the Lido di Venezia is a 12-kilometer-long strip of sand that is considered Europe’s first beach resort. It was once the place to be seen for celebrities and royalty, with grand hotels and Art Nouveau villas lining its golden sands.

It’s just a short vaporetto ride from St. Mark’s to Lido, which is more residential and less touristy than the center of Venice. Small canals still weave their way between the elegant architecture and there are plenty of waterfront restaurants where you can soak up the city views.

Many of the beaches at the southern end of Lido are privately owned by hotels and only accessible to guests, while there are public beaches at the northern end of the island near the San Nicolo Church. It’s here that some of the relics of St. Nicholas are housed, with the remainder in Bari. Be sure to admire the paintings by Palma the Elder and Younger and wander amidst the charming cloisters... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Campanile di San Marco
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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One of the most iconic landmarks in Venice, the Campanile di San Marco is the soaring bell tower of Saint Mark’s Basilica. It stands alone in a corner of Piazza San Marco near the front of the basilica and towers to a height of almost 100 meters. It features a fluted brick shaft and a loggia that surrounds a belfry housing five bells. This is topped by a cube with faces depicting the Lion of St. Mark and the female representation of Venice, together with a golden weathervane in the form of the Archangel Gabriel.

The Campanile di San Marco was originally constructed in the 9th century under the reign of Pietro Tribuno (887-912) to serve as a watch tower and was built on Roman foundations. It assumed its current shape in the 16th century during restorations following earthquake damage, with a sculpture of the lion of Saint Mark and Venice added in the attic.

The Campanile di San Marco was damaged numerous times by lightning strikes, before being equipped with a lightning rod in 1776... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Torre dell'Orologio
* Crowded with tourists
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Towering on the northern side of Piazza San Marco near the entrance to the Merceria, the Torre dell’Orologio adjoins the eastern end of the Procuratie Vecchie. This Renaissance clock tower, and popular point of interest, dates to the late 15th century and was designed to exhibit the wealth of Venice and strategically placed to be visible from the lagoon waters.

The Torre dell’Orologio clock was built by father and son team Gian Paolo and Gian Carlo Ranieri, with Mauro Codussi attributed with the tower’s design. The Merceria thoroughfare passes through the arch at the base of the tower, linking the political and religious center of Piazza San Marco to the commercial and financial hub of Rialto and offering a monumental entrance to Venice’s principal street.

The terrace at the top of the tower features two bronze figures known as the “Moors”, which strike the hours on a bell. They represent the passing of time, with one old and the other young... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Santi Giovanni e Paolo
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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One of the largest churches in Venice, Santi Giovanni e Paolo is located in the Castello sestiere and was built on the remains of an earlier church. Doge Jacopo Tiepolo donated the land after he experienced a vivid dream in which white doves flew over it. Most of Venice’s doges had their funerals within Santi Giovanni de Paolo in the post-15th century, with 25 buried at the basilica.

Santi Giovanni e Paolo is designed in an Italian Gothic style, with its brick construction completed in the 1430s. It was dedicated to two martyrs - John and Paul - of the early Christian church in Rome and built on a relatively large scale to be the principal Dominican church in Venice at the time.

The interior of Santi Giovanni e Paolo features funerary monuments and wall tombs for the doges, as well as senators, admirals and captains who were buried within the basilica. Artists Gentile and Giovanni Bellini are both buried here, as is Palma the Younger and the poet Bartolomeo Bragadin... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Campo Santa Margherita
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Situated near the University of Venice, Campo Santa Margherita is a prominent city square in the Dorsoduro sestiere. It is named after a church that once stood on its northern side and has long been home to fisherman’s stalls and a small vegetable market. Its proximity to the university and the St. Lucia train station makes it a popular gathering place, with a number of significant buildings lining the square.

Campo Santa Margherita is home to the Ospizio Scrovegni, an ancient hospice that was built in accordance with the will of 15th-century noblewoman Maddalena degli Scrovegni. It’s also here that the Scuola dei Varoteri is found, a two-story brick building where the confraternity of the tanners and furriers was founded in 1311.

The Scuola Grande dei Carmini is another confraternity building on the square, founded in 1594 under Doge Pasquale Cicogna. It features a Baroque facade designed by Francesco Caustello and Baldassare Longhena, together with a richly decorated landing adorned with a trompe l'oeil tile floor and gilded stucco ceiling... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Campo San Barnaba
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Located in the lively Dorsoduro sestiere of Venice, Campo San Barnaba is a small square named after the San Barnaba Church. This Neoclassical church was dedicated to the Apostle Saint Barnabas and dates to 1776 when it was reconstructed based on designs by Lorenzo Boschetti. It features a 11th-century campanile with a pinecone-shaped spire that is slightly detached from the main church, together with the Casin dei Nobili (Casino of the Aristocracy) that served as a lively gaming house during the 18th century. The church has been deconsecrated and now houses art exhibitions, although its facade did feature in the 1989 film “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” when it was depicted as a library.

Campo San Barnaba is home to a couple of snack stalls where you can grab a bite to eat, as well as a fruit store around the corner at the Fondamenta Gheradini. Pizzerias, gelaterias and bars line the square, as does a small book shop... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Murano
* Mildly touristic
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Renowned for its long tradition of glassmaking, Murano is a series of seven islands linked by bridges in the Venetian Lagoon. Jump aboard a vaporetto and make the short ride across the lagoon to visit Murano’s Museo del Vetro and shop for locally crafted glasswork.

The Museo del Vetro is located within the 17th-century Palazzo Giustinian and features a magnificent collection of Venetian glass dating back to Roman times. It offers a fascinating insight into the story of glassmaking throughout the centuries and makes a good first port of call.

Glass workers were first sent to Murano in the 13th century, reportedly to reduce the risk of fires from glass furnaces that might devastate the tightly packed streets of Venice. But others believe they were confined here to keep Venetian glassblowing techniques secret from the outside world. Today the canals of Murano are lined by glassblowing workshops and studios where you can purchase beautifully-crafted souvenirs... read more arrow

7.5 /10
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Lake Garda
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Lake Garda is the largest and probably the most popular of the Italian lakes, situated halfway between Milan and Venice. With its 50km length and 20km width, it covers three regions. Home to a collection of traditional towns that have retained its character and culture and at a stone's throw from Italy’s most iconic cities, is Lake Garda a perfect destination for everyone.

Lake Garda is a region of contrasts.

The narrower north end – the Altogarda - boasts mountainous landscapes, hillside villages, and harbor towns line the shores. It is the perfect playground for outdoor types. There are many opportunities for hiking and mountain biking. Go for a walk through the hillside of Malcesine and don’t miss a ride on the funicular from Malcesine to the top of Monte Baldo for breathtaking views of the lake.

Watersports are somewhat of a favorite here; the northern part of the lake has great surfing spots... read more arrow

7.5 /10
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Doge's Palace
* Crowded with tourists
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One of the biggest attractions in Venice is the spectacular Doge's Palace, also known as the Palazzo Ducale. Much of the present building dates from the 15th century – although an earlier building on the spot may date back to the 9th century - and has been rebuilt and added on to several times. The building was constructed in a dazzling pink and white marble design and has been described - fairly accurately - as an oversized wedding cake.

The Doge's Palace was the residence of the Doge – or chief magistrate – until the fall of the Venetian Empire in 1797. The building still occupies a prime location in Venice – situated between the lagoon and the small square known as the Piazza San Marco (St. Mark's Square). One reason for its strategic location was to impress visitors who arrived in the city by sea.

The entire palace is ornately decorated although there are several rooms in the palace that shouldn't be missed... read more arrow
7.4 /10
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Colonna di San Marco e San Teodoro
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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Located overlooking the water in Piazza San Marco, the Colonna di San Marco e San Teodoro are two columns topped with bronze and marble statues that honor Venice’s patron saints. San Marco Evangelista is depicted as a winged lion on the Column of the Lion, while San Teodoro is seen atop the other. Together with the docks of Palazzo Ducale and the Marciana Library, they greet visitors accessing Piazza San Marco from the sea.

The Colonna di San Marco e San Teodoro were constructed by Nicolò Barattiero under the dogato of Sebastiano Ziani during the 12th century at a time when Piazza San Marco was being enlarged. These grand monuments were transported from the East, with the winged lion of San Marco an ancient bronze sculpture of either Greek or Syriac origin. San Teodoro, the Byzantine saint and warrior, is depicted slaying a dragon in marble atop the column on the other side of the Marciana Library. The bust is from a Roman emperor’s classic statue, while the head, arms and legs are of medieval origin... read more arrow

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7.2 /10
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Santa Maria della Salute
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Positioned on the narrow Punta della Dogana that lies between the Grand Canal and the Giudecca Canal, Santa Maria della Salute is a Roman Catholic church in the Dorsoduro sestiere of Venice. Construction began in 1631 following a devastating outbreak of the plague and the church was dedicated to Our Lady of Deliverance (“Salute”), with many of its art works referencing the “Black Death”.

Santa Maria della Salute is located at the Bacino di San Marco, with its Baroque architecture visible when approaching Piazza San Marco from the water. This site was selected as it allowed for an easy procession from Piazza San Marco during the Festa della Madonna della Salute, which saw the city’s officials parade to the church in gratitude for deliverance from the plague. This is still a major event and attraction in Venice, taking place on November 21 each year.

Santa Maria della Salute was designed in an octagonal shape by Baldassare Longhena using Istrian stone and marmorino, with a pair of bell towers at the back... read more arrow

7.2 /10
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Rome Coliseum
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The roman coliseum ("colosseum" or "colosseo") is probably the most ancient world renowned monument in Rome. It was one of the very first roman amphitheatres to be built. It is located between the Caelian Hills and the Esquiline on on marshy type of land. Records show that the coloseum was built over many years and was inaugurated around 80 A.D. Learn more about the coliseum's history >

Although the brutality of the spectacles to be presented in the colosseum was to put man's so call dignity to shame, it's history sparkled people's imagination for generations. Gladiator fights, human fed to hungry beasts and violent sporting events has nothing the human race can be proud of. However, it's architectural magnificence will always make the colosseum one of the greatest historical monuments of Rome.

The colosseum was built to contain 50,000 spectators which is a monumental feat at that time considering it could still be considered huge in modern standards... read more arrow
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Piazza San Marco
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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The emperor Napoleon supposedly described it as "the finest drawing room in all of Europe" and if you visit Piazza San Marco in Venice, it's easy to agree with him. The square, also known as Saint Mark's Square – dedicated to the city's patron saint - is one of the most beautiful public squares in Europe.

St. Mark's is also one of the few large squares that are given over just to pedestrians, rather than vehicles. It's the only square in Venice known as a piazza – the other squares are technically called campi. Of all the attractions in Venice, this famous square is without a doubt one of the first places that tourists go see and hang out when arriving in the city.

The square has always been the location of most of the important offices of the Venetian state and a natural place for marches, parades and festivals of all kinds. Today, many of the city's most important buildings still lie on or close to St. Mark's – the Doge's Palace, St... read more arrow

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Bridge of Sighs
* Crowded with tourists
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The Bridge of Sighs is a limestone bridge in Venice that connects the Prison to the Palazzo Ducale (Doge's Palace). It crosses the Rio di Palazzo canal.

The bridge was built in 1600 under the supervision of Antonio Contino, the nephew of the architect of the Rialto Bridge.  

The name stands from the stories that prisoners would get a quick glance at the beautiful city when being moved back from the Palace to their cells.

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Museum of Naval History & Arsenal
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Established by the Italian Royal Navy in 1919 (just after the end of World War I), the Museo Storico Navale (Museum of Naval History) is located in the Castello district of Venice. It highlights the naval and maritime history of the city and its famous Arsenale (Arsenal), with a fascinating collection of ship models and old weapons.

Venice was once the most feared maritime power in the Mediterranean, with the Arsenale the largest shipbuilding complex on the continent until the end of the 17th century. It was originally founded in 1104 and expanded over time, employing as many as 16,000 workers at its peak of production.

The Arsenale was closely guarded to retain Venetian shipbuilding secrets, with a grand Renaissance-style arch at its land entrance. The arch is guarded by lions that were brought from Greece following the conquest of the Peloponnese in the 17th century. The Arsenale is now used for military purposes, but it’s here that the first shipbuilding models were once displayed and the Museum of Naval History’s collection was born... read more arrow

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Gallerie dell'Accademia
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Dedicated to pre-19th-century art, the Gallerie dell’Accademia is one of Venice’s most famous art museums. It’s situated on the southern bank of the Grand Canal and originally served as the gallery of the Accademia di Belle Arti di Venezia until the art school was relocated to the Ospedale degli Incurabili in 2004.

The Gallerie dell’Accademia is situated at the prestigious Scuola Grande de Santa Maria della Carità (the oldest of the six Scuole Grandi) within a building that dates to 1343. The complex includes the church of Santa Maria and the monastery of the Canonici Lateranensi, which was built by Andrea Palladio. The impressive facade of Santa Maria della Carità was completed by Bartolome Bon in 1441.

Today the Gallerie dell’Accademia boasts the most comprehensive collection of 15th to 18th-century Venetian paintings in the world, with many of its pieces brought here from monasteries, churches and palaces of the nobility... read more arrow

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Along with the distinctive Duomo, or cathedral and the famous statue of David by Michelangelo, the Ponte Vecchio has become one of the symbols of the beautiful Italian city of Florence.

The Ponte Vecchio – or Old Bridge – is the oldest bridge of several that span the River Arno, and the only one to survive World War II. It was built in 1235 by the architect Taddeo Gaddi and replaced an older wooden version of the bridge which had stood on the spot since Roman times.

The present bridge has the distinction of being Europe's oldest segmented arch bridge with the main arch spanning almost 100 feet and the two side arches spanning 88 feet. The innovative design meant that ships could navigate the river under the bridge more easily and it also made the bridge more resistant to floods.

The unique shops that line both sides of the bridge and give it its distinctive character have been there since the 12th century... read more arrow
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Piazza Navona
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Piazza Navona Fountain & Statues

From always, the Piazza Navona is synonymous with joy, festivities and popular entertainment. Today, Romans and tourists go hang there day and night besides street artists, musicians and portraitists. The medieval streets around the Piazza Navona are full of artisan shops, trattorias and pizzerias. There is an elegant and natural mixture of baroque and renaissance styled buildings.


Fountain Statue

Although the Piazza Navona reproduces in shape the antique Dominitian stadium, it is mostly an architectural celebration of the baroque and renaissance periods.


Since the beginning of the 16th century, the Popes wanted to embellish the small streets by building churches and palaces. Some of the elite people of the time made up their residences in the area which attracted librarians and other quality shops... read more arrow

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The Castel Sant'Angelo, also known as the Mausoleum of Hadrian, is located in the district of Borgo, in Rome. This cylindrical building was built on the right bank of the river Tiber between 135 and 139 AD. The ashes of the Roman Emperor Hadrian, who died in 138 AD, were placed there when the building was completed, and up until the year 217 AD, the ashes of other Roman Emperors were also placed here, in a room deep inside the building's interior.

This imposing structure consists of a basement which is quadrangular in shape—each side is almost 90 meters long, and this part of the building is 15 meters high. The cylinder which sits at the top of this structure is 64 meters in diameter, and 21 meters high. The mausoleum was originally adorned with a roof-top garden, a statue of Hadrian, and a bronze statue of a four-horse chariot, called a quadriga. The whole was enclosed in a high wall with bronze gates, which were decorated with peacocks (these are thought to have been a funerary symbol)... read more arrow
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Galleria degli Uffizi (Uffizi Gallery) is among the world's most celebrated, oldest and renowned art museums. It calls the Palazzo degli Uffizi in Florence, Italy its home. The Palazzo was originally built as offices for the Florentine magistrates of Cosimo I de' Medici. Construction was begun by Giorgio Vasari in 1560. What resulted is a horse shoe-shaped structure spanning the River Arno and the Piazza Signoria.

The gallery itself was founded in 1581 and has a superb and extensive collection – starting from the sculptures and paintings created or commissioned by the Medici family. In fact, it was founded by Francesco I, the de' Medici Grand Duke. Later on, the collection was expanded by the Lorraine Grand-dukes and by the state of Italy. The Medici's last heir, Anna Maria Luisa, generously shared the family collection to the state. By 1765, the collection was officially opened for public viewing... read more arrow
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When we say opera, there is probably none greater than the La Scala (or more formally known as Teatro alla Scala). Undoubtedly, it is one of the most important and popular opera houses in Italy and the world. Attending an opera performance at La Scala is an all-important part of your visit to Milan, Italy.

La Scala is located at Via Filodrammatici 2, right at the heart of Milan's city center, near the famous Duomo.

Most of the greatest and famous operas of the nineteenth century held their first performances in this grand opera house. In fact, it was with the musical masterpieces of Gioacchino Rossini that the La Scala Opera house gained worldwide acclaim. And it has continued to be a landmark in terms of opera from that time on. Other opera premieres witnessed by this theatre are Verdi's Otello and Falstaff, Puccini's Turandot and Madame Butterfly and Bellini's Norma... read more arrow
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Castello Sforzesco in Milan, Italy is a splendid palace that holds a significant place in Italian history. This fortified palace is a much beloved landmark, as it stood witness to the ebbs and flows of the city of Milan. It was built by the Viscontis and also the Sforzas, powerful men that ruled Northern Italy during the late Middle Ages up until the Renaissance period. The palace serves as an emblem of power for the Viscontis and the Sforzas. It has a tumultuous past, as it has experienced demolition and rebuilding several times.

The Sforza Castle traces its origins to the middle of the 14th century, during the time of Galeazzo II Visconti. It was built basically for defense, with towers at each corner of the palace. Then called Visconti Castle, it was declared as public property because of the lack of legitimate heirs. In 1447, the people of Milan tore down the castle and used the stones as payment for debts and to restore the walls of the town... read more arrow
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When it comes to luxury shopping in Milan, Via Montenapoleone is the street to be. This elegant street is lined with high-fashion stores, jewelry shops and great cafes. Montenapoleone proves that Milan is not Italy's fashion capital for nothing. Along with Via della Spiga, Via Sant'Andrea, Via Manzoni, Via Santo Spirito and Via Borgospesso, Montenapoleone forms a crucial part of what is called the Fashion Quadrilatero, which is, quite literally, the Fashion District in Milan. Montenapoleone is equivalent to rue Saint Honore in Paris.

The latest fashion in clothes, shoes and jewelry are here, since the big designers have a presence at Montenapoleone. Name it, they are here – Prada, Ferragamo, Gucci, Versace and so many more! The most prestigious brands and boutiques offer the ultimate in fashion luxury. After all, most of the renowned designers in the world hail from Italy and it is in Milan that they first gained acclaim and honed their craft... read more arrow
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Undoubtedly one of the best public squares in the world, Piazza del Campo is a sloping scalloped-shape area that stands as the heart of Siena, Italy. Its elegant beauty sweeps you off your feet, as it had captured the hearts of many for several centuries now. And it still is a plaza to fall in love with.

The city of Siena is nestled at the foot of three hills. The Piazza del Campo sits right smack at the point where the three hills (the San Martino, the Castellare and the Camollia) meet, thus symbolically uniting these hills. It harks back to the 13th century and is made of marble and red brick. These bricks are arranged into a sunburst pattern which is divided into nine distinct sections, each representing the members of the Government of Nine during the Medieval times. It also has eleven narrow streets that flow into the rest of the city.

The Piazza slopes downwards to the Palazzo Pubblico, which is the Siena's city hall... read more arrow
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When you speak of Genoa, Italy, the one predominant image is the tall lighthouse reigning over the harbor.

Indeed, the Lanterna in Genoa is a city symbol and landmark. Standing tall at 117 meters above sea level, this lighthouse is the world's oldest working lighthouse and certainly one of the world's tallest. It actually is a 77-meter high tower but as it is perched on a rock 40 meters in height, its total height reaches 117 meters. It occupies the site known as the Capo di Faro, also called the Beacon Promontory.

This ancient lighthouse has proved to be a welcoming light to boats and vessels for several centuries now. The Lanterna, as it is shown today, dates back to 1543, during Andrea Doria's career. However, it is said that the tower preceding the present one was built way back in 1128. The first tower was destroyed due to French raids and bombings during the mid 14th century... read more arrow
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One part of the eternal city that epitomizes the free willed spirit of Rome is the Piazza Campo de'Fiori. A large languid city square in the heart of Rome, it is a place where you can hear the Roman heart-beat. Encircled by buzzing cafes, bars and inns since very old times the place is home to a thriving fruit and vegetable market in the mornings and a throbbing and pulsating nightlife.

The Piazza was once nothing but a flood plain of the river Tiber, and the first church was built there in the pontificate of Boniface IX. Later on the Orsini Palace which used to once stand there once was rebuilt. The square was actually never formally conceptualized, but remained the focus of commerce and street culture catering to the outpourings from the streets surrounding and leading up to it. These streets accommodated various trades like cross-bow making, tailoring, coffee making, hat making and the like, and were therefore named after them... read more arrow
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Dante's House (Casa Di Dante) in the 13th century was home to Alighieri families. This area stretched between church Piazza dei Donati and S. Martino in Florence, Italy. At the onset of 20th century, Municipal Administration asked to build a façade, now known as Dante's House, to commemorate the birth of Dante Alighieri, the famous author of Divine Comedy. This world over acknowledged masterpiece in literature was written by the writer in Terza Rima, in his vernacular language.

Today, this building marks the prestigious seat of House-museum, re-opened for visitors view on June 1, 1994. The museum has three stores particularly symbolic of three impertinent stages of Dante's life. The first floor has rich reserves of important documents on Florence during the 13th century as well as records on Dante during his youth. Some of the most sought-after records on Dante include, his public lifestyle, participation in political scenarios and military struggles, christening of San Giovanni and his election... read more arrow
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Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls
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Imposing and elegant, the Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls - built in the 4th century - is one of Rome's four papal basilicas. About 2 km outside the Aurelian Walls (after which the basilica is named), this massive Roman church - and the second largest after St. Peter's Basilica- has undergone centuries of change and expansion. It was destroyed in a fire in 1823, rebuilt and reopened in 1840 thanks to the contributions of many faithful Christians from all over the world.

Inside, the Basilica of Saint Paul is marvelous, decorated with enormous marble columns and stunning gold mosaics. Due to the fire, parts of the Medieval basilica were destroyed, but some treasures survived, such as the 5th-century triumphal arch, with its restored ancient mosaics.

On the basilica’s walls, you should check out the papal portraits. Every pope since Saint Peter is represented here - there are 265 medallions - and a legend says that when there is no longer room for the next portrait, the world will fall... read more arrow

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Archbasilica of St. John Lateran (Cathedral)
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Most tourists are unaware of the Archbasilica of St. John Lateran, located over the Celio Hill on the south side of Rome. Even less might know that this splendid Basilica - and the oldest church in Europe - is the mother church of all Roman churches that ranks even above St Peter's Basilica in the Vatican.

The Basilica of St John Lateran is the official seat of the Bishop of Rome, (the Pope) and as such, it contains the papal throne. As the pope lives at the Vatican he rarely visits the church, however, it is used to celebrate Holy Thursday Mass.

Built in the 4th century - in honor of St. John the Baptist and John the Evangelist - the church has played a significant role throughout history; it was here that all popes were enthroned up until 1870.

The interiors are magnificent; the basilica is home to impressive columns, large statues, mosaics and ceiling-to-ground frescoes... read more arrow

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Rising above the trendy neighborhood Trastevere, south of the Vatican, is set the Janiculum Hill (Gianicolo in Italian). Some people consider it as the eighth hill of Rome. Nestled just outside the historical center, it is a peaceful place to visit and to get away from the hustle and bustle of Rome.

Janiculum played an important historical role defending the city; that's why its walking paths are full of sculptures of important heroes, including Giuseppe Garibaldi. 

The most attractive feature of Janiculum Hill is its sweeping view of Rome across the river that starts already when you walk up its pathways.

Janiculum is a charming location to stroll around; usually, there are activities for children, such as puppet shows or pony rides. You will find the following interesting landmarks as well:

1. The Botanic Garden, home to several thousands of plant species

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The Roman Ghetto (the oldest Jewish community in all of Europe) was established in 1555 on the banks of the Tiber. Here, until 1870, the city’s Jewish population was forced to live behind a walled gate, under severe restrictions and controlled by the Pope. It was built on low, malarial land subject to floods from the Tiber. Although the walls were torn down in 1888, today's neighborhood (located around Via del Portico d’ Ottavia) retains its culture. You will find a tightly knit, highly supportive community that still cooks meals together, celebrates holidays and festivals. The whole area arrays an authentic village feel.

When you visit this (Sant'Angelo) district you can't miss seeing the Synagogue of Rome along with the attached Jewish Museum. The today Synagogue was built after the unification of Italy in 1870 to celebrate the end of the Jewish Ghetto of Rome. 

The neighborhood is full of traditional restaurants serving Roman Jewish cuisine... read more arrow

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Once you've gotten a taste of the works of Renaissance master Caravaggio, you might want to head to the San Luigi dei Francesi church, to admire his most powerful works.

Located between Piazza Navona and the Pantheon, this opulent baroque church is home to a celebrated trio of Caravaggio paintings: the Vocazione di San Matteo (The Calling of Saint Matthew), the Martirio di San Matteo (The Martyrdom of Saint Matthew) and San Matteo e L’Angelo (Saint Matthew and the Angel), known together as the Saint Matthew cycle. These masterpieces of art belong to some of the earliest religious works of Caravaggio. These stunning examples of Roman Baroque Art are mainly renowned for the incredible use of "chiaroscuro", the contrast of light and dark.

As no information is available about the painting inside the church, you might want to read up on the works before visiting. Once you have admired the interior of the church, step outside to see the panorama of Rome from the church's Franciscan garden... read more arrow

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Giorgio De Chirico spent thirty years living and working in the 17th-century “Palazzetto dei Borgognoni” in Piazza di Spagna in the center of Rome, the city's cultural and artistic heart.

De Chirico – who passed away 40 years ago - is known to have produced artwork in the neoclassical and neo-Baroque style and his works are also featured in art institutions like the Guggenheim.

Following careful restoration, the Giorgio de Chirico House-museum opened to the public in 1998 and offers visitors a guided tour of some of the artistic production of this master of surrealism. The first of two living rooms is dedicated to works executed during the 1940s and 1950s, including several self-portraits and portraits of his wife, Isabella. 

The second part of the apartment (extended during the 1960s) exhibits some de Chirico’s so-called Neo-metaphysical works, while the upper floor preserves the artist’s atelier.

A visit to the two-level apartment also lets you have a glimpse of how the city's upper crust has lived for centuries and has stunning views over the piazza... read more arrow

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Just like Milan, Rome is a cult for shopping. The eternal city is full of elegant shops, megastores and big brands shops, in the city center or on the outskirts. The hotspot for high fashion is the Tridente area; it stretches to Piazza di Spagna, Via Condotti, till Piazza del Popolo. It's the luxury center of the city - loved by tourists and Romans - and one of the most expensive shopping area in Italy.

Via Condotti (its complete name is Via dei Condotti) dates to the ancient Roman era. It was already a fashionable street in the18th-century when Caffé Greco opened its doors and was frequented by e.g. Goethe and Byron. Today it is a heaven for shopaholics.

Most of Via Condotti is known for its fashion boutiques including the Gucci, Valentino, Armani, Prada, Ferragamo, Dolce & Gabbana. However, you will as well find highly skilled dressmakers, bookshops, and porcelain boutiques... read more arrow

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Ponte Sisto, or Sisto Bridge, is one of the most famous bridges in Rome crossing the Tiber River and connecting Rome’s historic center with the charming Trastevere neighborhood, where laundry swings overhead and flowers burst from window boxes.

The Ponte Sisto offers one of the most beautiful perspectives on Rome’s skyline, from the Janiculum Hill in the west to the St. Peter's Basilica in the north. Ponte Sisto was rebuilt on the ruins of the Roman bridge, “Pons Aurelio”, that was built under Emperor Antonino, with the aim to connect the two river banks.

The bridge is not only beautiful during the day, but even more at night when it is beautifully lit up. 

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Pope Francis holds a Papal Audience in St. Peter’s Square every Wednesday morning at 10:30 am that usually runs 60-90 minutes. During the winter months, they are held in the Paul VI Hall, and occasionally at the Pope’s summer residence, Castel Gandolfo.

The Vatican website has an up-to-date schedule informing about the location the audience takes place.

The Pope greets pilgrims in his audience in every major language and then gives a series of small teachings and readings in Italian. In the end, the Pope prays with those in attendance and gives the Apostolic Blessing.

Tickets for the audience are always free, but you’ll need to get them in advance.

The easiest way to pick up your ticket is to get them from the Swiss Guards at the Bronze Doors (located just after security at St Peter’s Basilica) on the Tuesday before the audience between the hours of 15:00-19:00 (from 15:00-18:00 in winter) or Wednesday morning before the mass... read more arrow

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Italians have been doing quality street food much longer than some of us might think. Italians do a parade around the piazza with gelato, or slice of pizza in their hand.

The ionic pizza

There are various types of pizza in Italy, the Neapolitan, Roman, and the authentic pizza al taglio (“by the slice”). Designed to be held in hand and eaten on the go, this pizza is baked slower and longer in trays, so it gets a crispy bottom. As it is baked in a conventional oven, this pizza has as well a different flavor from the ones baked in the wood-burning oven.

Mostly available from lunch through midnight, it makes the perfect snack. Only in Rome, there are an estimated 5,300 places that make this "pizza by the slice" so you have a wealth of choice.

We give you some suggestions about where to get one of Rome's best:

1. Volpetti Più... read more arrow

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Lago Trasimeno
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Lago Trasimeno is the largest lake in Central Italy. Thanks to its warm climate, with long summers and moderate winters, you can swim in the lake from May to September (and is safe for children as well). Pike and carp fishing is a favorite activity for many locals and tourists.

Lago Trasimeno has well-tended beaches and offers a variety of watersports including sailing, windsurfing, kayaking, and canoeing; rentals can be found in the town of Passignano.

The best beaches for sunbathing and swimming are just below Castiglione, near Tuoro and the fishing village of Torricella. Isola Polvese, a mostly uninhabited island, serves today as a public park. It can be reached by boat from the village of San Feliciano and has one of the best beaches on Lake Trasimeno.

Numerous beautiful villages are situated directly around Lago Trasimeno and are well worth a visit... read more arrow

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Riviera del Brenta
* Mildly touristic
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The Riviera del Brenta connects Padua with the lagoon of Venice by 36 km of beautiful and unique countryside: a landscape which portrays art and culture, nature and history.

The construction of the canal began in the 16th century. The idyllic green surroundings attracted many Venetian royalties to build their villas along the canal which was only a stone’s throw from Venice.

At first, their agricultural settings gave them a functional design, though quickly they were transformed into luxurious residences; the famous Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio designed many of them.

The area soon became populated, and it became a commonality for the nobility from the Venetian lagoon to possess a villa on the Brenta River, that they reached by ´Burchiello´ boat from San Marco in Venice.

A select number of the villas and their gardens have been restored and are open to the public. One of the most famous villas that is open to the public is Villa Pisani... read more arrow

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Palazzo Fontana Rezzonico
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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This palace owned by the Rezzonico family was built in the 1600s. It is also the birthplace of Carlo Rezzonico who became Pope Clement VIII. The Rezzonico family also constructed the Ca' Rezzonico, a bigger palace that is located on the Grand Canal.

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"What a wonder it is! So grand, so solemn, so vast! And yet so delicate, so airy, so graceful!"

With these words, Mark Twain captured the essence of the Duomo di Milano. This elegant and enormous Gothic Cathedral ranks high in the "Must See When in Europe" list. It is, in fact, one of Italy's landmarks. It also has the distinction of being one of the word's largest Roman Catholic cathedrals. It is second only to the Cathedral of Seville. It boasts of a capacity of 40,000 and is built on 12,000 square meters of land. The conception of the Duomo is attributed to Duke Gian Galeazzo Visconti.

It sits right in the center of Milan's main square and is a wonder to behold. Its central location alone indicates its importance. The streets circle or radiate from the Duomo. Built at the start of the 5th century, it took over five centuries to finish. It began with the building of Saint Ambrose's "New Basilica". Later in 836, another basilica was built adjacent to the existing one... read more arrow

* Regular pre-pandemic touristic activity level.

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