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Europe Attractions

Places to visit, points of interest and top things to see in Europe

9.2 /10
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Venice Canals
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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Thanks to its canals, Venice is known to be one of the most magical places on earth. The city is a testament to the ingenuity of the human spirit and man-made invention. Stone buildings of great beauty sit on the water; boats of varying sizes traverse the canals the way cars, trucks, and buses crowd the streets of more conventional cities; crowds throng the bridges and narrow pedestrian streets.

If one wants to understand the history of Venice, the best starting point is to understand the canals themselves and how their construction and history reflects and explains the city itself... read more arrow

9.2 /10
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Acropolis of Athens
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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Greece is the home to several acropolises or 'high cities', yet no visit to Greece would be complete without visiting the ancient splendor of the Acropolis of Athens. The Acropolis was first settled around 600 BCE and was inhabited continuously for centuries afterward. It is still the 'must-see' attraction for all of Greece.

The Propylaea

The Propylaea, built between 437 and 432 BCE, is the monumental gateway to the Acropolis. The building consists of the main structure flanked by two wings. Inside the buildings, Doric and Ionic columns divided the spaces... read more arrow
8.3 /10
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Alhambra

The jewel of Moorish Spain and still one of the country's national treasures and major attractions. The palace of Alhambra is the reason that most visitors come to Granada. Built during the Moorish occupation of Spain, the palace's stunning beauty is a reminder that while Christian Europe stumbled through the Dark Ages, the Moors of Andalusia reached unrivaled pinnacles of beauty and culture. It is an oasis of splendor set against the backdrop of mountains and the city of Granada... read more arrow

8.2 /10
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Westminster Palace & Clock Tower

Also known as the Houses of Parliament, the Palace of Westminster is one of London’s most iconic architectural landmarks and tourist attraction. It serves as the meeting place of both the House of Commons and the House of Lords and lies on the northern bank of the River Thames, with three towers rising above. 

It was in the 11th century that the first royal palace was built on the site but this was destroyed in 1512 and again in 1834, with Westminster Hall, the Cloisters of St Stephen's, the Chapel of St Mary Undercroft and the Jewel Tower the only medieval structures to have survived... read more arrow

8.2 /10
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Old Santiago de Compostela
Santiago de Compostela is located in northwest Spain. It has its own airport, approximately 11km southeast of the town. It is also accessible by walking the Camino de Santiago, the old pilgrimage route to the tomb of St. James. Santiago has been second only to Rome for European pilgrims for over 1000 years. Its Old Town, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, reflects in its architecture the important history of Santiago de Compostela... read more arrow
8.1 /10
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Sistine Chapel

In Rome, the Sistine Chapel is named for Sixtus IV della Rovere, who was Pope from 1471 to 1484. The chapel's interior walls are covered in exquisite frescoes painted by some of the greatest Italian artists in history, including Perugino, Botticelli, Ghirlandaio, Rosselli, and of course Michelangelo, who painted the stunning frescoes which adorn the ceiling. The chapel is not only a work of art; it is, in fact, still used as a site of papal religious activity—the election of a new Pope takes place in the chapel, at an event called a conclave... read more arrow

8.1 /10
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Stonehenge

Many places in this world receive many visitors and are considered important tourist attractions. Some places are popular due to their natural beauty, while others are popular as they have some unique man-made features in them. There are still other places that are a combination of both these qualities. Stonehenge is a monument that belongs to the prehistoric era.

The word Stonehenge actually comes from the old English words. The term literally means stone hinge. This name was given to this monument because the lintels of stone actually hinge on the other stones standing upright... read more arrow

8.1 /10
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St. Peter's Square
You are standing in a courtyard, surrounded by hundreds of other people who are equally awed by the majesty of the sights that you are all seeing. Before you, over 400 feet tall and almost 400 years old, rises the magnificent Saint Peter's Cathedral. As you turn to glance about the elliptical colonnade in wonder, you are greeted with the sight of hundreds of pillars holding up the ancient Baroque architecture. When your eyes reach the center of the square, you are greeted by the sight of an ancient Egyptian obelisk, dating back to the 13th century BC... read more arrow
8.1 /10
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Cinque Terre

Located in Italy's Liguria region, the predominant portion of the Cinque Terre is located on the coast of the Italian Riviera. It also comprises five villages: Riomaggiore, Monterosso al Mare, Corniglia, Vernazza, and Manarola.

The low-leveled hills note cinque Terre by the name La Spezia. Owing to its fascinating location, Cinque Terre is counted amongst the World Heritage Site, UNESCO.

Owing to its establishment on the riverbank, Cinque Terre predominantly enjoys a mild climate. The summers are long, characterized by humidity and heat... read more arrow

8.1 /10
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Puerta Del Sol Gate
The Puerta Del Sol surrounds the city since the 15th century and is one of the most popular and busiest locations, not just amongst tourists but also with the local Madrilènos. Translating in Spanish as the Gate of the Sun, it is the center from where Madrid Roads are measured and is facing the East direction. Hence this is point zero or kilometer zero for road measurements in the city.

The Puerta Del Sol is a square that houses the renowned clock of which the bells depict the traditional eating of twelve grapes and the start of a new year... read more arrow
8 /10
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Barri Gòtic Medieval Quarter
The Gothic Medieval Quarter of Barcelona is part of the larger Old Barcelona, or Casc Antic district. Locally, the Gothic Medieval Quarter is called Barri Gòtic. You can easily reach the area by taking the L3 metro line to the Liceu stop. After that is best to rely on your feet to get you from place to place.

There are many things to see in Barri Gòtic. It is one of the best preserved and integrated medieval cities in Europe. You can find evidence of Roman inhabitants dating from the first century AD, and many of the 3rd century AD Roman walls are extant... read more arrow
8 /10
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Puente Nuevo Bridge
Puento Nuevo, also meaning the New Bridge in Spanish, runs across the Guadalevin River and the El Tajo gorge in the town of Ronda in Andalusia, Spain. Though the views from the bridge are spectacular and there is something intimidating about this 120 metres deep gorge, in terms of engineering, there is nothing great about the bridge.

In fact, the supposedly "new" bridge is not so new – it was completed in 1793 when it could have been called an engineering feat. The first bridge, also known as the Puente de San Miguel was built by the Moors around 9th century... read more arrow
8 /10
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Palace of Versailles
The "City of light" is undoubtedly one of the world's most beautiful and fascinating cities - you could spend a lifetime here and not see everything that Paris has to offer. An easy day trip from Paris is to the Palace of Versailles, one of Europe's most spectacular and largest royal homes. Versailles is about a 30 minute train ride from the center of the city.

King Louis XIV – the "Sun King" - commissioned the palace in 1668 as well as the spacious and beautiful gardens. At one time, almost 2200 men were employed on its construction, which took almost fifty years... read more arrow
8 /10
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Villa Borghese

The Villa Borghese is a large natural park in Rome. It contains a few buildings, attractions and hosts the Galleria Borghese museum. Its main entrance is through the upward leading path of the Spanish Steps.

Greek Temple
The area was a vineyard up until the 17th century. Then Scipione Borghese, Cardinal, and nephew of the Pope Paul the fifth turned the area into a splendid garden... read more arrow
7.9 /10
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Leaning Tower of Pisa

The Pisa Tower, otherwise known as the Leaning Tower of Pisa, really was a labor of love, taking well over a hundred and fifty years to build. This tower is the campanile of Italy's cathedral, which means that it is a freestanding bell tower. The tower is located in what is known as the Field of Miracles (Campo dei Miracles), which is behind the actual cathedral's main building. The tower's most distinctive feature is that although it was designed to stand vertically, its poorly laid foundation causes it to lean significantly toward the southeast... read more arrow

7.9 /10
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Roman Forum

The Roman Forum, the heart of Rome. The citizens of ancient Rome spent a good part of their days there. The great place was surrounded with temples and legal buildings and filled with statues, bridges, arcs and columns. So the "Forum Romanum" was a remarkable marketplace center point for all business and shopping made by the ancient citizens of Rome.

The Forum was also used by Roman orators for public speaking... read more arrow

7.9 /10
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Playa Mayor
Plaza Mayor reflecting monumental Madrid, Spain, is the center of the city. Originally known as Plaza Del Arabal, was redesigned after a series of fires. Juan De Villanueva was the architect responsible for reconstructing the building in 1790. Following this episode, the Plaza has undergone several names - Plaza Real, Plaza De La Constitucion, and Plaza De La Republica until it was finally named as Plaza Mayor. A symmetrical square in design, the Plaza Mayor measures 129 by 94 meters... read more arrow
7.9 /10
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Musee d'Orsay
Musee d'Orsay in Paris, France, is a museum located in what used to be a railway station, the Gare d'Orsay. This museum boasts of a huge collection of paintings by Renoir, Monet, Delacroix, Degas, Gaugin, Van Gogh and other impressionist artists. It also focuses on the art scene between 1848 and 1915, which is said to be the early modern era for art in France. The collection also includes not just paintings but furniture, photographs and sculptures.

The setting itself is an interesting tidbit that adds to the fascination of Musee d'Orsay... read more arrow
7.9 /10
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Florence's Duomo
Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore
The skyline of Florence (Firenze), Italy wouldn't be the same without the stunning Cathedral or Duomo that so personifies the grandeur and elegance of the city. The Duomo, which translates to "the Cathedral" or "Dome Cathedral", has a long and regal history dating back to the end of the 13th century.

The Duomo's Architecture
Near the end of the thirteenth century, the government that oversaw the Republic of Florence decided to replace their under-sized, rather plain Santa Reparata with a more majestic worshipping house... read more arrow
7.9 /10
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Museo del Prado
The Museo del Prado, or Prado Museum, is located on the Calle Ruiz de Alarcón in Madrid. It is arguably Spain's most famous art museum. To reach Museo del Prado take the light blue line metro to the Atocha stop or the red line metro to the Banco de España stop. It is open from 9am to 8pm Tuesday through Sunday. Admission is 8€ ($11) for adults, with discounts for students and seniors. Admission on Sunday is free.

The building which holds the Museo del Prado was commissioned by King Charles III in 1785... read more arrow
7.9 /10
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The Old Port of Genoa
7.9 /10
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Trevi Fountain

The Trevi Fountain is one of the most popular and photographed fountain in the world. This grand fountain, most likely the most beautiful one in Rome, is located in the Quirinale district and is clearly the masterpiece of the small Trevi square. "Trevi" is derived from the word "Trivium", meaning "where three streets meet". This monumental baroque Trevi Fountain is within walking distance of the Piazza Navona and the Spanish Steps.

Neptune
Trevi Fountain History

The fountain was designed by the artist Nicola Salvi, who Pope Clement XII commissioned in 1732... read more arrow

7.8 /10
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Parque del Buen Retiro
Parque del Buen Retiro is located in the heart of Madrid, Spain. It is best accessed through the Alcala Gate. You can reach it by taking the metro to the Retiro or Ibiza stops. This scenic park is open all year round, but the weather is best in the spring and fall. Sundays are especially crowded with families enjoying the greenery and weather. However, Sunday is also the best time to see a wide variety of street performers.

Buen Retiro is a roomy 350 acres park... read more arrow
7.8 /10
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Montjuïc
Montjuïc is a large hill and wooded area located southeast of the center of Barcelona in Spain. Parts of Montjuïc overlook the Mediterranean Sea. Montjuïc is a big place, but the best metro access comes on lines 1 and 3 at the Espanya stop. No matter from where you leave the park, you should be able to find bus service. The Montjuïc area is open all the time, but timings vary for its different attractions. Make sure to do some research before planning your trip.

Montjuïc is a haven of fresh air and quiet in the busy city of Barcelona... read more arrow
7.8 /10
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La Sainte Chapelle
A jewelry box. A light show. A diamond reflecting the light with its many facets.

This is La Sainte Chapelle in Paris and more. It is best to visit this gem of a chapel during the day, when there is plenty of sunlight. La Sainte Chapelle may be small, but oh, the wonder and excitement when you see how natural light plays with it!

La Sainte Chapelle (or Holy Chapel) harks back to 1246, when it was built as a home to the relics of the True Cross... read more arrow
7.8 /10
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Centre Pompidou
The Centre Georges Pompidou is to be found at the Beaubourg area of Paris, France. It is near Marais and Les Halles at the IVe arrondissement. This controversial building was constructed in the 1970s and now houses a variety of institutions. These include the National Museum of Modern Art, a library (Bibliothèque publique d'information) and others.

Ever since it opened its doors in 1977, it has been the subject of many an argument, because of its bold "exo-skeletal" design made of glass and metal and the use of brightly colored pipes that are visible to all... read more arrow
7.8 /10
Undoubtedly the most famous avenue in the world, Champs-Elysees in Paris, France, is blessed with a unique elegance and charm. That is also why it is considered the world's most beautiful avenue. Even with traffic surging along it, there really is something special in the experience of ambling along Champs-Elysees. The streetlamps at dusk provide an exceptional atmosphere to the length that spans from the Place Charles de Gaulle (where you can find the Arc de Triomphe) to Place de la Concorde.

"Champs-Elysees" translates to "Elysian Fields" in English... read more arrow
7.7 /10
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La Sagrada Familia
La Sagrada Família, or Church of the Holy Family, is located in central Barcelona. Take the metro line 2 or 5 to the Sagrada Família stop. Admission is 11€ ($16) for adults and 9€ ($13) for students and seniors. This price does not include the lift up to the spire. Before you plan a trip to La Sagrada Família, it is best to visit the cathedral's website; not only do timings change seasonally, but access can be restricted due to mass or construction work... read more arrow
7.7 /10
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Promenade de la Croisette
The first thing that comes to mind when you say Cannes is the Cannes Film Festival, with all its glitz and glamour. And yes, La Croisette is very much part of this, as this promenade is very much a part of the activities for the film festival.

Promenade de la Croisette (which, in English, means the "Avenue of the Little Cross" is a famous boulevard that spans its share of the Mediterranean Sea. It is named thus because of the little cross that stood east of the bay. La Croisette, as it is fondly called, is about 2 kilometers in length and is lined with chic hotels (some harking back to the Belle Epoque period), the most expensive of shops and restaurants... read more arrow
7.7 /10
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Jardins des Plantes
Visit the oldest garden in all of France – the Jardins des Plantes in Montpellier in the Languedoc-Rousillon region. It may come as a surprise to most tourists, but this haven is just 20 minutes' walk from the Place de la Comedie. But these lovely gardens are a welcome respite and a haven of peace and tranquility. Do come here to relax and breathe in the fresh air that only gardens seem to have.

This botanical paradise is filled with over 3,500 species of indigenous and exotic plants... read more arrow
7.7 /10
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Spanish Steps

The Spanish Steps is another top-rated attraction located in Rome's heart ("Centro Historico"). It is also one of Rome's favorite romantic spots and one of the most popular city landmarks.

The Spanish Steps has 138 steps that connect the Piazza di Spagna (or Spanish Square), one of the most elegant square, at the bottom to the Franciscan Trinità dei Monti church at a higher level. These nice and elegant steps were made by Francesco de Sanctis between 1723 and 1726... read more arrow

7.7 /10
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St. Mark's Basilica
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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The Basilica di San Marco ("Saint Mark's Basilica" in English), right next to Saint Mark's Square and near the Doge's Palace, is the most famous of Venice's churches is among the world's best-known examples of Byzantine architecture. Today, the basilica is considered a living monument to the heritage of the Byzantine, Roman, and Venetian cultures.

Brief history

The Basilica di San Marco has gone through many changes in its 1200-year history. It was initially constructed as a temporary building in 828 for housing holy relics of Saint Mark the Evangelist, believed to have authored Mark's Gospel... read more arrow
7.7 /10
The Conciergerie is a fortress in Paris, France that used to house kings and subsequently prisoners. It served as the Royal Apartments prior to the completion of the Louvre, which became the new Royal Residence. La Conciergerie was constructed during the early part of the 14th century. It came with a guardroom, a kitchen and a men-at-arms room. This was built by the architects Jean de Saint-Germer and Nicolas des Chaumes. It was originally an extension of the royal Palais de la Cite, it stands beside the twin towers (the Tour de Cesar and the Tour d'Argent)... read more arrow
7.6 /10
Saint Peter's Basilica in Vatican City, surrounded by the city of Rome, is a sight that delights the eye and captures wonder and beauty from every angle. With a dome that may have helped to inspire Saint Paul's Cathedral in London among others, Saint Peter's rises over Vatican City like a shining star.

The Saint Peter's Basilica, also known as the Basilica of Saint Peter, is the foremost place of worship of His Holiness, the Pope, who is the religious leader of the Catholic people. Public religious ceremonies officiated by the Pope are often performed within the Cathedral... read more arrow
7.6 /10
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Rialto Bridge
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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One of the four bridges spanning the Grand Canal in Venice, the Rialto Bridge is the oldest and serves as the dividing line between the San Marco and San Polo districts. The Rialto Bridge is the main pedestrian access to Venice from the train station and most likely one of the first main tourist attractions to be recognized.

Early history

It began as a floating pontoon bridge built by Nicolò Barattieri in the late-12th century and was named Ponte della Moneta due to its proximity to the mint's entrance. 

As traffic began to increase when the Rialto market flourished on the canal's eastern bank, the pontoon was replaced by a more permanent wooden bridge in 1255... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Ca' d'Oro (Palazzo Santa Sofia)
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Officially titled Palazzo Santa Sofia, the Ca’ d’Oro (or “Golden House”) is one of Venice’s Grand Canal's oldest palaces. It was nicknamed due to the gilt and polychrome decorations that once adorned the walls, with delicate marble filigree by Bartolomeo Bon on the façade that would have made an undeniably impressive vision.

History

The Ca’ d’Oro was built by architects Giovanni Bon and his son, Bartolomeo Bon, between 1428 and 1430 for the wealthy Contarini family... read more arrow
7.6 /10
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Teatro La Fenice
* Crowded with tourists
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Considered one of "the most famous and renowned landmarks in the history of Italian theatre”, Teatro La Fenice is an opera house in the heart of Venice. It was here that some of the most celebrated operas were premiered during the 19th century, including those by composers such as Verdi, Bellini and Rossini.

A burning history

Teatro La Fenice was constructed from 1790 to 1792 to replace the Teatro San Benedetto that had burned to the ground, with the name “La Fenice” (not "La Venice"), referring to the opera company’s survival... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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The Iconic Gondola
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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An iconic symbol of Venice, gondolas are a traditional, flat-bottomed rowing boat that was once the preferred means for Venetians to get around the city’s canals. These wooden boats are made by hand in special workshops known as squeri, with some still in operation today. A ride in one of these remains one of the top things to do in Venice by tourists.

During the 17th and 18th centuries, it is estimated that there were between eight and ten thousand gondolas in the city, with vaporetti now the main means of getting around. Of the few hundred gondolas that remain, most are used in festival parades and local rowing competitions or by tourists wanting a romantic perspective of Venice... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Scuola Grande di San Rocco
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Dating to the 16th century, the Scuola Grande di San Rocco is one of the most beautiful buildings in Venice. It was constructed from white marble to house a charitable society dedicated to San Rocco, regarded by many as a protector against the plague. It was designed like most other scuole in Venice, with two halls (one on the ground floor and the other above), with a staircase and landing topped by a dome connecting the two. Numerous architects worked on the building, including Bartolomeo Bon and his son Petro, as well as Sante Lombardo, Antonio Scarpagnino and Giangiacomo dei Grigi,

In 1564, soon after the scuola’s completion, the artist Tintoretto was commissioned to paint a central panel on the ceiling of the Sala dell’Albergo... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Ca' Rezzonico
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Located on the Grand Canal in the Dorsoduro sestiere, Palazzo Rezzonico (also known as Ca' Rezzonico) is an opulent palace that provides a fascinating glimpse into 18th-century Venetian life. It was designed by the Baroque architect Baldassare Longhena, but not completed until 1756 (almost 100 years later) by Giorgio Massari.

The palace is set across three stories, with an opulent marble façade facing the Grand Canal and ornate Baroque decorations. Massari remained true to the original plans of Longhena, only adding a few of his own design elements to reflect architectural developments since the palazzo’s conception... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Situated on the Campo dei Frari in the heart of the San Polo district, the Basilica di Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari is one of the most important churches in Venice. Affectionately known as the “Frari”, construction began on the church around 1340 by the Franciscans and its immense campanile (the second tallest in the city) was completed in 1396.

The Basilica di Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari is constructed from brick and one of three Venetian churches built in the Italian Gothic style. It is the only church in the city to still contain its original rood screen, an ornate partition between the chancel and nave... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Torcello Island
* Mildly touristic
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Considered the “parent island” of Venice, Torcello lies at the northern end of the Venetian Lagoon. It was first settled in the 5th century, developing into a bustling commercial town with its own cathedral by the 12th century and believed to be from where Venice’s population originated.

While it once contained palaces, churches, shipyards and docks, today there are only two churches and a small collection of homes remaining. Torcello’s cathedral is dedicated to Santa Maria Assunta and dates to 639 AD, and is considered the best example of Venetian-Byzantine architecture still standing today... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Santa Maria dei Miracoli
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Nicknamed the “marble church”, Santa Maria dei Miracoli is one of the best-preserved examples of early Venetian Renaissance architecture. It was designed by Pietro Lombardo and built between 1481 and 1489 to enshrine a picture of the Virgin Mary, with the plans expanded in 1484 to include a new convent. The convent was built to house the nuns of St. Clare on the eastern edge of the church and connected by an enclosed walkway that no longer stands. Today Santa Maria dei Miracoli is one of the most popular places to be married in Venice because of its exquisite interior... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Lido di Venezia
* Mildly touristic
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Separating the Venetian Lagoon from the Adriatic Sea, the Lido di Venezia is a 12-kilometer-long strip of sand that is considered Europe’s first beach resort. It was once the place to be seen for celebrities and royalty, with grand hotels and Art Nouveau villas lining its golden sands.

It’s just a short vaporetto ride from St. Mark’s to Lido, which is more residential and less touristy than the center of Venice. Small canals still weave their way between the elegant architecture and there are plenty of waterfront restaurants where you can soak up the city views... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Campanile di San Marco
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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One of the most iconic landmarks in Venice, the Campanile di San Marco is the soaring bell tower of Saint Mark’s Basilica. It stands alone in a corner of Piazza San Marco near the front of the basilica and towers to a height of almost 100 meters. It features a fluted brick shaft and a loggia that surrounds a belfry housing five bells. This is topped by a cube with faces depicting the Lion of St. Mark and the female representation of Venice, together with a golden weathervane in the form of the Archangel Gabriel... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Torre dell'Orologio
* Crowded with tourists
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Towering on the northern side of Piazza San Marco near the entrance to the Merceria, the Torre dell’Orologio adjoins the eastern end of the Procuratie Vecchie. This Renaissance clock tower, and popular point of interest, dates to the late 15th century and was designed to exhibit the wealth of Venice and strategically placed to be visible from the lagoon waters.

The Torre dell’Orologio clock was built by father and son team Gian Paolo and Gian Carlo Ranieri, with Mauro Codussi attributed with the tower’s design. The Merceria thoroughfare passes through the arch at the base of the tower, linking the political and religious center of Piazza San Marco to the commercial and financial hub of Rialto and offering a monumental entrance to Venice’s principal street... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Santi Giovanni e Paolo
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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One of the largest churches in Venice, Santi Giovanni e Paolo is located in the Castello sestiere and was built on the remains of an earlier church. Doge Jacopo Tiepolo donated the land after he experienced a vivid dream in which white doves flew over it. Most of Venice’s doges had their funerals within Santi Giovanni de Paolo in the post-15th century, with 25 buried at the basilica.

Santi Giovanni e Paolo is designed in an Italian Gothic style, with its brick construction completed in the 1430s. It was dedicated to two martyrs - John and Paul - of the early Christian church in Rome and built on a relatively large scale to be the principal Dominican church in Venice at the time... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Campo Santa Margherita
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Situated near the University of Venice, Campo Santa Margherita is a prominent city square in the Dorsoduro sestiere. It is named after a church that once stood on its northern side and has long been home to fisherman’s stalls and a small vegetable market. Its proximity to the university and the St. Lucia train station makes it a popular gathering place, with a number of significant buildings lining the square.

Campo Santa Margherita is home to the Ospizio Scrovegni, an ancient hospice that was built in accordance with the will of 15th-century noblewoman Maddalena degli Scrovegni... read more arrow

7.6 /10
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Campo San Barnaba
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Located in the lively Dorsoduro sestiere of Venice, Campo San Barnaba is a small square named after the San Barnaba Church. This Neoclassical church was dedicated to the Apostle Saint Barnabas and dates to 1776 when it was reconstructed based on designs by Lorenzo Boschetti. It features a 11th-century campanile with a pinecone-shaped spire that is slightly detached from the main church, together with the Casin dei Nobili (Casino of the Aristocracy) that served as a lively gaming house during the 18th century... read more arrow

7.6 /10
7.6 /10
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Murano
* Mildly touristic
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Renowned for its long tradition of glassmaking, Murano is a series of seven islands linked by bridges in the Venetian Lagoon. Jump aboard a vaporetto and make the short ride across the lagoon to visit Murano’s Museo del Vetro and shop for locally crafted glasswork.

The Museo del Vetro is located within the 17th-century Palazzo Giustinian and features a magnificent collection of Venetian glass dating back to Roman times. It offers a fascinating insight into the story of glassmaking throughout the centuries and makes a good first port of call... read more arrow

7.6 /10
Mont Saint-Michel, France, as seen from afar, is mystical, imposing and magical. It stands majestic as it gazes down from its lofty heights. It stands in the bay that is daily assaulted by the highest tides in Europe. Seated from its lofty height, it provides you with magnificent panoramas of the Bretagne and Normandy coastline.

Legend says that the whole fortification was made at the request of Michael, the archangel. In response, Aubert, then the Bishop of Avranches, has a small church built in 709... read more arrow
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Basilique Sacre Coeur is a revered landmark in Paris, France. The Basilica of the Sacred Heart marks the city's highest point, on top of the hill of Montmartre. And from that lofty mount, it serves as a very visible reminder of Christian traditions.

The basilica is an immense example of the Roman-Byzantine style, it has soaring dome towers - 83 meters tall! It is built with Château-Landon stones that naturally maintains its white color as it bleaches with age... read more arrow
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The monument stands for triumph – the triumph of the human spirit against the odds. The Arc de Triomphe in Paris, stands proudly, a fitting memorial to homage the brave ones who fought during the Napoleonic Wars, for the honor and freedom of their beloved country, France.

You can see this monument displayed in the middle of the Place Charles de Gaulle, right at the end of the magnificent Champs-Elysees. It is part of a series of monuments that begins from the courtyard of the Louvre Palace all the way to the outskirts of Paris... read more arrow
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Located on an island in the Schlei, a narrow inlet of the Baltic Sea, Schloss Gottorf is a historic castle estate that served as the ancestral home of the House of Oldenburg. It lies just a couple of kilometers from the Old Town of Schleswig and boasts two of the state’s most significant museums.

The island was first settled as an estate in the 12th century as the residence of Bishop Occo of Schleswig before being transferred to the Count of Holstein of the House of Schauenburg in 1340. It was later inherited by Christian I of Denmark who was the first Danish monarch from the House of Oldenburg... read more arrow

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Nestled in the historic heart of Mainz is St. Martin’s Cathedral, a 1000-year-old cathedral that serves as the episcopal see of the Bishop of Mainz. Its soaring towers dominate the half-timbered houses of the pedestrianized Old Town and it represents the high point of Romanesque cathedral architecture in Germany.

The Cathedral of Mainz was first established in 975AD but continually restored and rebuilt over successive centuries... read more arrow

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Located on the northern edge of the Segeberger Forest between the towns of Bad Bramstedt and Bad Segeberg, the Eekholt Wildlife Park is home to around 100 different species of native wildlife. It showcases the animals in their natural habitats while raising awareness about sustainability in nature.

The Eekholt Wildlife Park was founded in 1970 and is still privately run to this day. It was created to convey awareness about the ecological interdependence of plants, animals and humans, with diagrams and exhibits illustrating the role each plant or animal plays in maintaining the ecological balance... read more arrow

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Lake Garda

Lake Garda is the largest and probably the most popular of the Italian lakes, situated halfway between Milan and Venice. With its 50km length and 20km width, it covers three regions. Home to a collection of traditional towns that have retained its character and culture and at a stone's throw from Italy’s most iconic cities, is Lake Garda a perfect destination for everyone.

Lake Garda is a region of contrasts.

The narrower north end – the Altogarda - boasts mountainous landscapes, hillside villages, and harbor towns line the shores... read more arrow

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Sacrario militare di Asiago

The Asiago War Memorial, also known as Sacrario del Leiten, is a monument built to the memory of World War 1 combatants that fought in the Battle of Asiago.

It was created by Orfeo Rossato and displayed to the public in 1938.

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Doge's Palace
* Crowded with tourists
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One of Venice's biggest attractions is the spectacular Doge's Palace, also known as the Palazzo Ducale. Much of the present building dates from the 15th century – although an earlier building on the spot may date back to the 9th century - has been rebuilt and added several times. The building was constructed in a dazzling pink and white marble design and has been described - fairly accurately - as an oversized wedding cake.

The Doge's Palace was the Doge's residence – or chief magistrate – until the fall of the Venetian Empire in 1797... read more arrow

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Colonna di San Marco e San Teodoro
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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Located overlooking the water in Piazza San Marco, the Colonna di San Marco e San Teodoro are two columns topped with bronze and marble statues that honor Venice’s patron saints. San Marco Evangelista is depicted as a winged lion on the Column of the Lion, while San Teodoro is seen atop the other. Together with the docks of Palazzo Ducale and the Marciana Library, they greet visitors accessing Piazza San Marco from the sea.

The Colonna di San Marco e San Teodoro were constructed by Nicolò Barattiero under the dogato of Sebastiano Ziani during the 12th century at a time when Piazza San Marco was being enlarged... read more arrow

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The Massif des Calanques offer a unique experience. This geological formation shaped like fingers mark the rocky coastline between Marseille and Cassis in Provence. Hiking, going on trails, diving, swimming and rock-climbing are just some of the sports that are yours to enjoy as you get a load of the Calanques. The rugged terrain beckons with its unique geological beauty. The towering peaks of white limestone are indeed an unforgettable sight to behold... read more arrow
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Las Ramblas is the main artery of Old Barcelona. It is approximately half a mile of boulevard that intersects the city center. On one side of Las Ramblas is the Gothic Medieval Quarter; on the other side is the Raval area. Las Ramblas sees primarily pedestrian traffic, so it is best to reach there by taking the L3 metro to the Drassanes, Liceu, or Catalunya stops.

During the day, Las Ramblas is a great place for first-time visitors to Barcelona to stroll, soaking up the sun and atmosphere of the old city... read more arrow
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What is a visit to Russia without a trip to the Kremlin in Moscow? This imposing site has stood witness to many tumultuous and victorious moments in Russian History. It is in itself an awe-inspiring sight.

The Kremlin (or literally, "fortified town") is the seat of power in Russia. It is from this fortress city that the czars issued their commands and ruled all of Russia. The high walls that completely enclose the Kremlin are also dotted with 17 towers, all placed strategically. The Kremlin is a veritable smorgasbord of architectural treasures... read more arrow
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Named after Pavel Tretyakov, the Tretyakov Gallery, in Moscow, is one of the most important art museums in the world. It houses a large collection of art, including about 2,000 Russian art works donated by its namesake. Tretyakov donated the works from his private collection during the late 19th century. From there, the collection grew and grew and the gallery now houses works from the 11th century right up to the 20th century. The collection includes works from famous Russian Realists and Impressionists, plus art nouveau works, landscapes, portraits and sacred icons... read more arrow
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The monument stands at the Decembrists Square, opposite the Neva River in St. Petersburg, Russia. It is framed by St. Isaac's Cathedral, the Admiralty and the buildings of the former Synod and Senate. It is said that as long as the monument stands in the midst of the city, St. Petersburg will never be defeated. It is passionately defended by the people. In fact, it survived the Siege of Leningrad because the statue was not taken away from the city but was protected by a wooden shelter and sand bags... read more arrow
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The Neuschwanstein Castle, located in the Bavarian region of Germany is the ultimate when you are thinking of fantasy castles. It is the quintessential 19th century romantic palace. 

Commissioned by King Ludwig II of Bavaria as a retreat and homage to Richard Wagner, Neuschwanstein Castle is one of the world’s most photographed royal residences. It was built using his personal funds (and through extensive borrowing) and opened to the public shortly after his death in 1886. It is believed to have inspired Disneyland's Sleeping Beauty Castle, with its over-the-top Romanesque Revival architecture... read more arrow

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The Barcelona Aquarium is located on Moll d'Espanya del Port Vell off the Ronda del Litoral in Barcelona, Catalonia, and directly on the waterfront. The aquarium opens at 9:30am all year round, but its closing times vary according to the seasons; check the website before planning your trip. Admission to the Barcelona Aquarium is 17€ ($24) for adults and 12 ($17) for children. Tickets are available for online purchase.

The Barcelona Aquarium opened in September of 1995, and has had over 14 million visitors since then... read more arrow
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Seville Spring Fair
Come Spring and the air in Seville in Andalusia, Spain, is transformed into one of joy and rapture as the town starts preparing for the Seville Fair, also known as the April Fair or Feria de Sevilla. The fair begins on a Sunday at the stroke of twelve and is on until the next Sunday. Held on a ground of 1.2 million square meters known as the Real de la, the fair is officially inaugurated by the Mayor of Seville by switching on the lights of the grounds. This scene itself is breathtaking!

The grounds are arranged in three sections – one dedicated for parking, one section houses an amusement park and a large area is dedicated for casetas... read more arrow
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La Mesquita
The prime attraction of Cordoba in Andalucia, Spain is La Mesquita, also known as the Great Mosque. With architecture that has flavors of Egyptian, Syrian, Roman and Gothic styles, Cordoba's Mesquita attracts about 1.5 million visitors annually and claims to be the third largest worship place in the world. The mosque has not only borne several modifications to its original structure over the years, it has also been a witness to changes and fusion of both the Occident and Caliphate in Cordoba... read more arrow
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Santa Maria della Salute
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Positioned on the narrow Punta della Dogana that lies between the Grand Canal and the Giudecca Canal, Santa Maria della Salute is a Roman Catholic church in the Dorsoduro sestiere of Venice. Construction began in 1631 following a devastating outbreak of the plague and the church was dedicated to Our Lady of Deliverance (“Salute”), with many of its art works referencing the “Black Death”.

Santa Maria della Salute is located at the Bacino di San Marco, with its Baroque architecture visible when approaching Piazza San Marco from the water. This site was selected as it allowed for an easy procession from Piazza San Marco during the Festa della Madonna della Salute, which saw the city’s officials parade to the church in gratitude for deliverance from the plague... read more arrow

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The Marble Palace

Mramornyi Dvorets or the Marble Palace is located in Saint Petersburg, in Russia. The Neoclassical palace is located between the Palace Quay and the Field of Mars, near the Winter Palace. The Empress Catherine the Great had this built for her favorite nobleman, Count Grigory Orlov. Construction and design of the palace began from 1768 and lasted for 17 years.

The architect Antonio Rinaldi designed the palace, which features opulent marble decorations - pink Karelian marble pillars, Finnish granite floors, and white marble festoons and capitals... read more arrow
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Rome Coliseum

The roman coliseum ("colosseum" or "Colosseo") is probably the most ancient world-renowned monument in Rome. It was one of the very first roman amphitheaters to be built. It is located between the Caelian Hills and the Esquiline on marshy type of land. Records show that the colosseum was built over many years and was inaugurated around 80 A.D. Learn more about the coliseum's history >

Although the brutality of the spectacles presented in the colosseum was to put man's so call dignity to shame, its history sparkled people's imagination for generations... read more arrow

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Piazza San Marco
* Overcrowded with overtourism issues
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The emperor Napoleon supposedly described it as "the finest drawing room in all of Europe" and if you visit Piazza San Marco in Venice, it's easy to agree with him. The square, also known as Saint Mark's Square – dedicated to the city's patron saint - is one of the most beautiful public squares in Europe.

St. Mark's is also one of the few large squares that are given over just to pedestrians, rather than vehicles. It's the only square in Venice known as a piazza – the other squares are technically called campi. Of all the attractions in Venice, this famous square is without a doubt one of the first places that tourists go see and hang out when arriving in the city... read more arrow

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Bridge of Sighs
* Crowded with tourists
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Museum of Naval History & Arsenal
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Established by the Italian Royal Navy in 1919 (just after the end of World War I), the Museo Storico Navale (Museum of Naval History) is located in the Castello district of Venice. It highlights the naval and maritime history of the city and its famous Arsenale (Arsenal), with a fascinating collection of ship models and old weapons.

Venice was once the most feared maritime power in the Mediterranean, with the Arsenale the largest shipbuilding complex on the continent until the end of the 17th century. It was originally founded in 1104 and expanded over time, employing as many as 16,000 workers at its peak of production... read more arrow

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Gallerie dell'Accademia
* Moderately crowded tourist spot
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Dedicated to pre-19th-century art, the Gallerie dell’Accademia is one of Venice’s most famous art museums. It’s situated on the southern bank of the Grand Canal and originally served as the gallery of the Accademia di Belle Arti di Venezia until the art school was relocated to the Ospedale degli Incurabili in 2004.

The Gallerie dell’Accademia is situated at the prestigious Scuola Grande de Santa Maria della Carità (the oldest of the six Scuole Grandi) within a building that dates to 1343... read more arrow

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Along with the distinctive Duomo, or cathedral and the famous statue of David by Michelangelo, the Ponte Vecchio has become one of the symbols of the beautiful Italian city of Florence.

The Ponte Vecchio – or Old Bridge – is the oldest bridge of several that span the River Arno, and the only one to survive World War II. It was built in 1235 by the architect Taddeo Gaddi and replaced an older wooden version of the bridge which had stood on the spot since Roman times.

The present bridge has the distinction of being Europe's oldest segmented arch bridge with the main arch spanning almost 100 feet and the two side arches spanning 88 feet... read more arrow
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Place de la Comedie is the "heart" of Montpellier in France. Although it is not its center in terms of geographical position, it is the center of Montpellier as it is where the locals, mostly the young, stay to hang out, people-watch and chat with friends. This plaza is where the life of the city ebbs and flows. You can join the locals and sit at the many cafes in the area and watch the hustle and bustle of the people going by, even as you sip your cup of hot latte... read more arrow
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The Columbus Monument is called Monument a Colom in Catalonian. It is located near the crossroads of Passeig de Colom and Rambla de Santa Mònica. It is on the waterfront at Plaça del Porta de la Pau. You can reach it by taking metro line 3 to the Drassanses. The exterior of the monument is always open and free of charge. If you wish to go inside the tower it is open year round from 9am to 8:30pm. Entrance fee is 2€ (or approximately $3)... read more arrow
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Piazza Navona
Piazza Navona Fountain & Statues

From always, the Piazza Navona is synonymous with joy, festivities and popular entertainment. Today, Romans and tourists go hang there day and night besides street artists, musicians and portraitists. The medieval streets around the Piazza Navona are full of artisan shops, trattorias and pizzerias. There is an elegant and natural mixture of baroque and renaissance styled buildings.


Fountain Statue

Although the Piazza Navona reproduces in shape the antique Dominitian stadium, it is mostly an architectural celebration of the baroque and renaissance periods... read more arrow

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Considered the German version of Versailles, the Sanssouci Palace lies within a sprawling park in Potsdam. It served as the summer palace of Frederick the Great, King of Prussia, and was designed in an elaborate Rococo style, surrounded by beautifully manicured gardens.

The Sanssouci Palace was built by Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff between 1745 and 1747 with the purpose of being a relaxing escape for King Frederick away from the Berlin court. Its name “Sanssouci” exemplifies this, translating from French to “without concerns” or “carefree”... read more arrow

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Built to house the High Command of the Army and the Supreme Command of the Armed Forces during World War II, the Maybach I and II were a cluster of above and below ground bunkers built near Zossen in Brandenburg. They were named after the Maybach automobile engine and together with the nearby military complex, they played an instrumental role in the planning of field operations for the Wehrmacht, connecting the military with civilians along the front lines.

Maybach I was built between 1937 and 1939 in the lead up to World War II and consisted of twelve above-ground three-story buildings that appeared like local housing... read more arrow

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The Castel Sant'Angelo, also known as the Mausoleum of Hadrian, is located in the district of Borgo, in Rome. This cylindrical building was built on the right bank of the river Tiber between 135 and 139 AD. The ashes of the Roman Emperor Hadrian, who died in 138 AD, were placed there when the building was completed, and up until the year 217 AD, the ashes of other Roman Emperors were also placed here, in a room deep inside the building's interior.

This imposing structure consists of a basement which is quadrangular in shape—each side is almost 90 meters long, and this part of the building is 15 meters high... read more arrow
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Contrary to popular misconception, the Red Square is not named "Red" because of the color of the square's bricks (although they are actually red) or as an allusion to Communism. The Red Square is actually "Krasnaya Ploschad" in Russian. The word "Krasnaya" means "beautiful" in old Russian, but it eventually evolved to mean "red". However which way you call it – beautiful or red – you will be right on the spot when describing this popular tourist destination. It is, after all, the center of the Soviet government. In fact, the Red Square is the government's official address... read more arrow
During World War II, Leningrad (now Saint Petersburg) underwent a 900-day siege by the Nazis. The people of Leningrad bravely defended their city, withstanding the lengthy siege and valiantly protecting the Bronze Horseman (as Peter the Great's monument is known). They also prevailed despite of hunger, cold and nonstop bombardment. Russia eventually triumphed against the Nazi Attacks. For their courage, strength of spirit and sense of nationality, a monument was built in their honor... read more arrow
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The Winter Palace (or "Zimnyi Dvorets") was the main residence of the Russian tsars during winter. It is located in Saint Petersburg, at Millionnaya Ulitsa.

It lends its majestic presence along the bank of the Neva River. The palace is superbly designed in the Baroque tradition. It is particularly impressive because of its elaborately adorned rooms and halls (there are about 1,000 such halls and rooms!). It also has close to 2,000 windows, nearly 1,800 doors... read more arrow
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The Peter and Paul Fortress (Petropalovskaia Krepost) in Saint Petersburg, Russia, was Peter the Great's answer to possible attack from the Swedish army. When he reclaimed the lands on the banks of the Neva River, he had the fortress built on Hare Island (Zayachii Ostrov), an island in the Neva. Workmen labored overtime to finish the fortress because they expected an impending attack from the Swedes. The attack never came since the Swedes were defeated even before the fortress was completed. However, the foundation of the fortress (on May 1703) also resulted in the birth of St... read more arrow
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Galleria degli Uffizi (Uffizi Gallery) is among the world's most celebrated, oldest and renowned art museums. It calls the Palazzo degli Uffizi in Florence, Italy its home. The Palazzo was originally built as offices for the Florentine magistrates of Cosimo I de' Medici. Construction was begun by Giorgio Vasari in 1560. What resulted is a horse shoe-shaped structure spanning the River Arno and the Piazza Signoria.

The gallery itself was founded in 1581 and has a superb and extensive collection – starting from the sculptures and paintings created or commissioned by the Medici family... read more arrow
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When we say opera, there is probably none greater than the La Scala (or more formally known as Teatro alla Scala). Undoubtedly, it is one of the most important and popular opera houses in Italy and the world. Attending an opera performance at La Scala is an all-important part of your visit to Milan, Italy.

La Scala is located at Via Filodrammatici 2, right at the heart of Milan's city center, near the famous Duomo.

Most of the greatest and famous operas of the nineteenth century held their first performances in this grand opera house... read more arrow
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Castello Sforzesco in Milan, Italy is a splendid palace that holds a significant place in Italian history. This fortified palace is a much beloved landmark, as it stood witness to the ebbs and flows of the city of Milan. It was built by the Viscontis and also the Sforzas, powerful men that ruled Northern Italy during the late Middle Ages up until the Renaissance period. The palace serves as an emblem of power for the Viscontis and the Sforzas. It has a tumultuous past, as it has experienced demolition and rebuilding several times... read more arrow
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When it comes to luxury shopping in Milan, Via Montenapoleone is the street to be. This elegant street is lined with high-fashion stores, jewelry shops and great cafes. Montenapoleone proves that Milan is not Italy's fashion capital for nothing. Along with Via della Spiga, Via Sant'Andrea, Via Manzoni, Via Santo Spirito and Via Borgospesso, Montenapoleone forms a crucial part of what is called the Fashion Quadrilatero, which is, quite literally, the Fashion District in Milan... read more arrow
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Undoubtedly one of the best public squares in the world, Piazza del Campo is a sloping scalloped-shape area that stands as the heart of Siena, Italy. Its elegant beauty sweeps you off your feet, as it had captured the hearts of many for several centuries now. And it still is a plaza to fall in love with.

The city of Siena is nestled at the foot of three hills. The Piazza del Campo sits right smack at the point where the three hills (the San Martino, the Castellare and the Camollia) meet, thus symbolically uniting these hills... read more arrow
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When you speak of Genoa, Italy, the one predominant image is the tall lighthouse reigning over the harbor.

Indeed, the Lanterna in Genoa is a city symbol and landmark. Standing tall at 117 meters above sea level, this lighthouse is the world's oldest working lighthouse and certainly one of the world's tallest. It actually is a 77-meter high tower but as it is perched on a rock 40 meters in height, its total height reaches 117 meters. It occupies the site known as the Capo di Faro, also called the Beacon Promontory... read more arrow
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The D-Day Beaches in Normandy, France, with its gentle sand dunes and coves, lay witness to one of history's greatest moments during wartime. This is where 100,000 soldiers lost their lives in a bid to secure and liberate this section of Europe from the rule of the Germans. The coastline was a strategic line of defense, one that the Allied troops tried to breach and one the German forces tried to defend at all costs. This coastline was transformed into an unbroken fortress armed with land mines, guns, wire, beach obstacles and pillboxes... read more arrow
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The Musee Rodin in Paris is, as the name suggests, a showcase of the works of the renowned French sculptor, Auguste Rodin. In addition, you will find here many aspects of Rodin's life – Rodin the art collector, Rodin the painter, Rodin the person and of course, there is a collection of sketches he made prior to transforming these into sculptural masterpieces.

The place used to be the Hotel Biron, which was Rodin's residence since the early 1900s. The chic 18th century hotel, along with its surrounding grounds, was converted into a museum upon the sculptor's behest... read more arrow

* Regular pre-pandemic touristic activity level.

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